Dear UESiders,

Some vacay week.

Fairway bankrupcy.  Coca Cola announces – because, it says, that’s how customers like things – it’ll continue to bottle in plastic.  MTA Chief Byford resigns.

Well, at least if one’s so inclined and hope Train Daddy will reconsider (again), folks are suggesting we weigh in with emails to the governormayor, City Council Speaker, Assembly Member Seawright and Council Member Kallos or Council Member Powers.     

A simple “Bring Back Byford” message will do. 

Moving on to the sunny side:

Now to Thursday, March 5th:  Project Cicero Book Collection Campaign

Drop off at AM Seawright’s District Office, 1485 York Avenue between 78th & 79th Streets,  9:30am-5pm

Launched on the UESide by Assembly Member Seawright, all-volunteer Project Cicero’s ,  dedicated to collecting gently used books appropriate for NYC pre-school to high school readers.  Drop off at the AM’s office and, yes, books can also be purchased via Project Cicero’s site!!

Saturday, December 14th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

It may be cold…  It may rain…  It may snow…  But at their tables will be the great American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone,  SunFed Beef, Ballard’s Honey,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley, Gayeski and Nolasco Farms!!

How many ways can one prepare winter vegs?  (We want to try every one!!) 

Saturday & Sunday, January 25th & 26th:  AKC Meet the Breeds 2020

Javits Center, 429 Eleventh Avenue,  10am

Meet and play with hundreds of dogs!!  Learn about responsible pet ownership, 200 different breeds of dogs AND even some cats, too!!  (Yes!!  CATS!!)  Children under 12, $10.  Adults, $25.60-$100.  For more and tickets

Sunday, January 26th:  92nd Street Y E-Waste Recycling Event 

Lexington Avenue between 91st  92nd Street, 10am-4pm

Amazing how infrequently one sees e-waste left abandoned on UES streets…  That’s thanks to residents’ inherent greenness and events like this… Collected will be computers, monitors, printers/scanners, keyboards, mice, cables,TVs, VCRs, DVD players, phones and cellphones, AV equipment, PDAs and more!!  For the full iist…  (And do keep in mind, Best Buy 86th is our always available UES drop-off point!)

Sunday, January 26th:  CM Kallos’s 2020 State of the District Address

MSK Auditorium, 430 East 67th Street, 12:30-3pm

Get acquainted with great UES volunteer organizations/opportunities/initiatives and local info from 12:30-1pm, then lend your ears and eyes to the CM and his objectives for our district and city over the coming year and beyond.  Accessible of course.  To RSVP… 

Thursday, February 13th:  Destination Deco – An Illustrated Lecture

Church of Heavenly Rest, 1085 Fifth Avenue, 6:30pm  

We’re loaded with glorious brownstones, of course…  But our hood’s also blessed with an impressive collection of Art Deco masterpieces, too.  Learn all about ’em courtesy the great Friends of the Upper East Side Historic District.  Members, $15.  Non-members, $25.  For more and tickets… 

And then there’s this:

Reusable bags in different sizes

And this:

If NYState’s signing up amphibian migration volunteers can spring be so far away…??

Our best,

UGS

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Friday, January 17, 2020 

Dear UESiders,

Still on revelling in vacay time, but you should know:

Saturday, January 25th:  The Brooklyn Casssoulet Cook-Off

Biba of WWilliamsburg, 110 Kent Street, Brooklyn 1-4pm

Who knew there’re 10 styles of cassoulet??  Now we do and they’ll all be on offer and prepared by an impressive roster of chefs!!  $55.  For tickets and more

Sunday, January 26th:  92nd Street Y E-Waste Recycling Event 

Lexington Avenue between 91st  92nd Street, 10am-4pm

Amazing how infrequently one sees e-waste just abandoned on UES streets…  That’s thanks to inherent greenness and events like this… Collected will be computers, monitors, printers/scanners, keyboards, mice, cables, TVs, VCRs, DVD players, phones and cellphones, AV equipment, PDAs and more!!  For the full iist…  (And do keep in mind, Best Buy 86th is our always available UES drop-off point!)  

Miscellany:

The Times weighs in on NYC’s most recent real estate boom

This while Isaacs/Holmes residents seem to have extracted some maintenance concessions from NYCHA powers-that-be

Visiting cruise ships and NYC air

If you believe disabled workers should be paid a full – not partial – wage

Twenty Sanford White buildings still gracing NYC

The lowdown on one of our favorite birds, the adorable, tiny (and endangered) northern rockhopper penguin...

Our best,

UGS

Friday, January 10, 2020

Dear UESiders,

Another time-sensitive newsflash while we vacay:

*Word’s been ricocheting round that the powers-that-be intend to close down NYC compost pioneer Lower East Side Ecology Center’s processing site in East River Park way before a long established date!!  We quote: 

Each week, more than 3,500 households depend on LES Ecology Center’s compost program, which began on the Lower East Side in 1990. We offer ten drop-off sites for food scraps, prevent hundreds of tons of organic material from entering landfill, and introduce countless New Yorkers to the benefits of composting. LES Ecology Center collects and composts these scraps locally in the East River Park and distributes finished compost to local community gardens, schools, and block associations caring for street trees and open green open space.

Now, the City is seeking a construction contract to destroy the East River Compost Yard earlier than anticipated. Not only will this cut many New Yorkers off from composting and effectively kill LESEC’s community compost program, but it’s also a tremendous waste of taxpayer dollars. The plan is moving ahead without community input and was not even announced in recent community board meetings.

If you support composting, please let the City know how you feel. We demand that the compost yard stay operational until the 2023 reconstruction for this part of the Park actually starts. We also demand that the City engage with the LES Ecology Center to finish the design for the renovated compost yard as part of the ESCR reconstruction.

Yes and of course, those responsible for this green-negative notion – the mayor,  Parks Commissioner Silver,  Design & Construction Commissioner Grillo and area Council Member Carlina Rivera – need to be buried under protesting emails and petition signatures.

Emails don’t have to be ornate.  A simple “As a dedicated NYC composter, I strongly object to the untimely closing of the LESEC’s East River Compost Yard” will suffice.

Let ’em feel We The People’s will!!

Our best,

UGS

Friday, January 3, 2020

Dear UESiders,

A micro-mini edition to convey:

*A newsflash from Uber Market Manager Margaret:  “1857 Vodka will be dropping in at 82nd this Saturday and do these folks ever make incredible potato Vodka!  Check ’em out:  http://www.1857spirits.com and stop by for a sample!!

*Margaret adds:  “The 2019 Greenmarket Winter Warrior Program launches this week!!  Just collect a card at the market info tent, get it punched every winter Saturday and you’ll not only earn market loyalty bragging rights but a fun mystery prize!! 

Meanwhile, let us not forget:

*Mulchfest continues!!  Yes, we have another 6 days – till January 9th – to get that tree up to Schurz Park at 86th & East End for chipping and – if you drop off Saturdays, 10am-2pm  – a thank-you bag of mulch for your own gardening efforts!!  But whether chipped or out for street collection, please do remove lights, decorations, tinsel and stand!!  Let’s make mincemeat of  last year’s 28,000-tree record, people!! 

*Last but hardly least…  Replaced those vintage Christmas tree lights with ultra greener LEDs?  Recycle the oldsters by sending them off to the Christmas Light Source, 31 Elmwood Drive, Benbrook, Texas 76116!!

Happiest new year and decade!!

Our best,

UGS 

*(Scroll down one entry further for Friday, December 20th)*

Saturday, December 14th

Dear UESiders,

Yes, it’s another mini-edition and brought on by looming holidays, of course.

Therefore and in brief: 

Saturday, December 14th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

On hand and with tables laden with both holiday treats and necessities will be American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone,  SunFed Beef, Ballard’s Honey,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley, Gayeski and Nolasco Farms!!

Yes, our very own Master Knife Sharpener will be on hand, too!!

If you haven’t already, be sure to check out Nolasco Farm’s table…  Beautiful stuff and complimenting our other great farmers’ wonderful produce!!

Last week’s recycling totals:  102 lbs. batteries;  13 lbs. cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  1 pair of eyeglasses;  1 mascara wand; 20 compost bins; 43 bags of clothes

20 bins!!  Yet another incredible record-breaking compost Saturday!!

Brief but we’re not skipping the week‘s good news:

*Tin Pan Alley’s been landmarked at freaking last!!  (Good on you, 29th St. Neighborhood Association!!) 

*Climate Activist Extraordinaire (and all of 16-years young) Greta Thunberg is Time‘s Person of the Year!

Our best,

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week:  Chicago’s totally tragic recycling rate’s 9%!!
2019 Recycling at 82nd (from 1/5/19):  3309 lbs batteries;  856 lbs cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  204 pairs of eye glasses;  15 make-up wands;  6 thermometers;   24 Nespresso pods:  651 1/2 compost bins;  1999 bags of clothes;  26,469 lbs of paper
2018 TOTALS 82nd STREET – 16,085 COMPOSTERS; 102,374 POUNDS  (51.2 TONS)

2019 Recycling at 92nd (from 6/23/19):  169 lbs batteries;  163 lbs cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  9 pairs eye glasses;  1 make-up wand;  67 1/2 compost bins;   5,600 lbs. of paper
10/26 – TBA  11/3 – TBA  11/10 – TBA   11/17 – TBA    11/24 – TBA  

2018 TOTAL 92nd STREET – 2,561 COMPOSTERS; 15,821 POUNDS (7.9 TONS)

2019 Compost collected at Lenox Hill, 70th & First (from 1/8/19):   11/5 – 12/10 – TBA  
2018 TOTALS:  3,432 COMPOSTERS;  16,292 POUNDS  (8.11 TONS)      

2019 Compost collected at 96th & Lex (from 1/9/19):    11/6 – 12/11  TBA
2018 TOTALS:  4,316 COMPOSTERS;   23,231 POUNDS  (11.65 TONS) 

Eco Tip of the Week:  Recycle old/uneeded keys in your building’s metal/glassplastic bin!!
 

 

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Happy Holidays, UESiders!!

The busiest holiday season ever, we’re thinking!!

Therefore, let us get down on the chockful days/weeks ahead:

Friday, December 20th:  Christmas with the Strads

Metropolitan Museum, Grace Rainey Auditorium, 1000 FIfth Avenue, 7pm

And we quote, “The Handel+Haydn Society returns to The Met for a special holiday concert featuring festive music by Vivaldi, Charpentier, Biber, Telemann, and others. For this very special occasion, The Met will bring out its famous Stradivarius, “The Gould” Violin, to let it sing once again in the hands of the virtuoso Baroque violinist Aisslinn Nosky of The Handel+Haydn Society.”  Adults, $75.  Children, $1.  For more and tickets

Friday, December 20th:  Comfort Ye… 25th Annual Concert to Benefit the Homeless

St Paul and St Andrews United Methodist Church, 86th Street & Amsterdam Avenue, 8pm

Acclaimed soprano Lauren Flanigan and friends from the Metropolitan Opera perform  to raise goods and awareness for New York’s homeless.  All proceeds from the concert will directly benefit The West Side Campaign Against Hunger Food Pantry.  Admission to the event is either a used clean overcoat OR a warm clean blanket OR a new unwrapped toy suitable for a child under 12 OR purchase of a $40 ticket. For tickets and more…  (Thanks to reader Susan Blackwell for the tip!!)

Saturday, December 21st:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

At tables laden with holiday food wishes will be American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone,  SunFed Beef, Ballard’s Honey,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley, Gayeski and Nolasco Farms!!

But, no, given yet another nippy weather prediction, no Master Knife Sharpener this Saturday…  She’s – and aren’t we all – hoping to be back with us next Saturday!! 

Uber Market Manager Ciana adds:  “Of course, we’ll be having a special, holiday-inspired demo!!  Plus, do check out our collection of truly great recipes!!”

(We second and triple that!!)

Last week’s recycling totals:  72 lbs. batteries;  20 lbs. cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  4 pairs of eye glasses;  1 mascara wand;   TBA compost bins;  47 bags of clothes

(Arrived late at the Market after the compost truck had departed, so the question looms:  Did we have another 18 bin week??)

Thursday, December 26th to Saturday, January 11th:  Mulchfest/Chipping Saturday/Time to Say Firwell

Carl Schurz Park, 86th Street & East End

Two choices this post-holiday…  Drop off your tree – clean of lights and all decorations –  any old time OR bring that tree to either of the two Chipping Saturdays – January 4th or 11th – from 10am to 2pm and go home with your very own bag of mulch!!  We recycled 28,000 trees last year…  Let’s break that record!!   

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020:  First Day Hike

All Over New York State

What better way to welcome a new year and decade than being in nature!!  There’ll be some 60 destinations on offer, each offering a special experience!!  Check ’em out!!

Tuesday, January 7th:  The Every Other Tuesday Knitting Group Resumes

AM Seawright’s Community Office, 1480 York Avenue between 78th & 79th, 2-4pm

It’s 2020 and UES crafters will be back exchanging points-of-view, along with knitting/crocheting/needlework tips!! As ever, all genders, ages and skill levels are welcome!!  (That means you, too, guys!!)  Just RSVP

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, January 17th, 18th & 19th:  10th Annual Knitting Live by Vogue Knitting

New York Marriott Marquis, 1535 Broadway

A marketplace withn unbelievable array of fantastic yarns from around world…  Classes on every conceivable knitting technique and conducted by experts…  Lectures…  Cocktail parties…  Check it out!!

Saturday, January 18th:  Subway Art Tour Two

Meeting place revealed with reservation, 1pm

Second in the series with veteran tour guide Phil Desiere leading a journey from 14th Street south into Brooklyn and back to Astor Place…  With commentary and time to savor the art at each of the 10 stops!!  Organized by the Municipal Art Society.  Members, $20.  Non-members, $30.  For more and tickets…

Thursday, January 16th:  Treasures in Trash Tour  

Manhattan 11 Sanitation Garage, 343 East 99th Street, Group 1 – 1-2pm, Group 2 – 2:15-3:15pm 

And we quote:  “More than three decades ago, one sanitation worker named Nelson Molina started searching for treasures among the trash.  Now a collection numbering more than 40,000 objects and ephemera, the Treasures in the Trash collection includes everything from cherished century-old family portraits and autographed baseballs to chipped Pez dispensers and an army of Furbies…”  Organized by the Municipal Art Society and for members only.  $15.  For more and to join… 

Friday, February 21st:  Inka Road Food Fiesta

National Museum of the Aemrican Indian, 1 Bowling Green, 6:30-8:30pm

Again we quote: “Explore the foods found in communities that live along the Inka Road of South America.  Freddie Bitsoi, executive chef of the Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe, and other guest chefs will share the stories and food traditions that sustained – and continue to support – the diverse people of the intricate road system.”  There’ll be Andean music and a tour of the museum’s “Great Inka Road” exhibition, too!!  Not up on the site yet, but keep an eye on the Museum’s event page!!

Sunday, March 1st:  The NYS Plastic Waste Reduction Law Takes Effect!!

All over NYS

Going to be a beautiful, brave new world of bring your own bag!!    For details

Some activism as the year and decade end…

Now that they’ve got Tin Pan Alley landmarked, the 29th Street Association’s moved on to saving Ithe beautiful Demarest Building

Yes, and one more time, if you oppose the Williams Pipeline running across our harbor

Or should you be against a pipeline crossing the Appalachian Trail

Goldman Sachs just became the first US bank to rule out financing for Arctic oil drilling, thermal coal mines, and coal-fired power projects worldwide!!  So, how about adding the likes of JP Morgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, Bank of American and Citi to that green circle… 

If you’d like our national parks to remain free of  food trucks, coffee shops and the like

Then there’s plain old miscellany:

Tree and menorah lightings across NYC

And another 32 free things to do in NYC today…  (With thanks to 1,000+ Friends for both tips!!) 

The world’s oldest forest’s in NYS…!!   (Are those ancient tree roots chatting?  If so, what’re they talking about?)

old forest

Researching That Ancient Forest’s Remnants…

What the great EsplanadeFriends has and intends to achieve in the coming year and beyond… 

The Straphangers Campaign weighs in on our city’s Transportation best and worst

For the moment, EPA moves to delay rules on methane emissions from landfills have hit a judicial wall… 

CVS’s getting their wrists slapped bigtime for failing to redeem bottle and can deposits in California

Those rumors of a whole-scale end to curbside recycling in the U.S.?  Yes, some, but pretty small given the number of programs countrywide… 

New Jersey’s in the process of passing an organics diversion bill

Further on the subject of organics, GrowNYC Recycling has a bunch of  great volunteer opportunities…  

Further on why landfill is an ever-diminishing option

Reason #8,697 why we live in NYC:   We’ve still got typewriter stores

NYS snowmobile safety courses

And tentless backpacking

The Times on our holiday lights

Top 10 books checked out of the NY Public Library in all 5 boroughs…

What the Historic Districts Council’s been up to in 2019

The right way to recycle our cardboard boxes

Reining in bass poachers…  An eagle rescue…  Our NYS Conservation officers are ever busy…

DNA in ancient chewing gum

Eco-inspired restoration of Scottish bogs

In the totally off the reservation file:

So, sure, Andrew Carnegie gave us many a library and Carnegie Hall, but the Carnegie Hero Fund, too…??  Wow.

For those unfamiliar with the classic British doc series that began with 1964’s “Seven Up!” and continued with 7-year installments thereafter…  Do yourself the favor of getting familiar…   Commencing with the Sunday Times‘ article…   Then watch the films on Netflix!!

Time for some critters:

A baby groundhog saved

baby ground hog

That Baby Groundhog

(BTW, the hospital caring for this little guy is where our recycled mascara wands go!)

Otters that can smell under water

Bird boarding and the NYC shortage thereof 

Decoding NYS animal tracks

What we’ve always want to know about bobcats

Nope, we’re not forgetting the Hudson River Almanac:

12/12 – Manhattan:  With winter nigh, our sampling was now down to once-a-week as we checked our research gear in Hudson River Park aboard the steamship Lilac, moored at Pier 25. We were met with the usual invertebrate suspects: mud crabs, isopods, amphipods, and shore shrimp. But, not so usual were the sand shrimp (Crangon septemspinosa). The delight of the catch however, was our third spotted hake (Urophycis regia) of the season, a young-of-year  (60 mm). – Toland Kister, Melissa Rex

And the Fish of Week is:

2/9 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 51 is the tessellated darter (Etheostoma oldstedi), number 162 (of 230) on our watershed list of fishes. 

Tesselated Darter

A Tessellated Darter

The tessellated darter is a freshwater perch (Percidae) one of eight members of that family in the watershed. Among others are yellow perch and walleye. Of the eight, three are native species, including the yellow perch, northern logperch, and the tessellated darter.

Darters draw their common name from their hunting strategy. They lie motionless on the sandy river bottom they prefer. Being perfectly camouflaged – pale yellow-to-green with dark X’s and Y’s – nearly invisible, propped on their pelvic fins, they await prey such as insects (especially mosquito larvae), small fishes, amphipods, and shrimp. Then, in a blur, they dart out capturing their target. Tessellated darters are short (no more than 90 mm-long) and nearly terete in cross-section. 
– Tom Lake

And with that…

May your holidays be absolutely the most warm, wonderful and green!!

Until 2020,

UGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy World Soil Day, UESiders!!

A bit dry, but most worthwhile to check out how the U.N. weighed in on this year’s World Soil Day focus:  Erosion…  Whether by water, wind or over-cultivation. 

On a local note…  This fall, we’ve been really impressed with the change in Island Garden soil quality.  Those who planted island trees had to have consciously sought out the worst filler around…  A woeful combo of sand, clay and contruction/ demolition debris.  Four years, many a bag of compost and hours of devoted volunteer gardening later, it’s actually beginning to approach normal!!

Our friends at GrowNYC weigh in:

“Soil is essential for earth’s ecosystems and plays a key role in filtering our water, providing nutrients for plants and storing carbon.

Soil erosion is the removal of fertile topsoil through the action of water, wind, and tilling the soil.  Adding compost can help revive soils by adding organic matter, nutrients and beneficial microorganisms back into the soil.  Plus, compost helps soils retain moisture which helps reduce soil erosion.”

And are we UESiders ever creating compost!!

Moving on to the coming week:

Saturday, December 7th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

With us will be our whole winter season team:  American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone,  SunFed Beef, Ballard’s Honey,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley, Gayeski and Nolasco Farms!!

But, no, given the chilly weather prediction, no Master Knife Sharpener this Saturday…

Uber Market Manager Margaret adds:  “We’re looking forward to the return of Nolasco Farm this week!! In addition, our well-rested regulars – American Seafood, Sun fed Beef and Ballard’s Honey – will be back from their week off!!  So come on out and stock up!!  And be sure to stop by the info tent ( moved to the east side of the yard), to see what Manager Ciana is cooking up!!”

Last week’s recycling totals:  55 lbs. batteries;  11 lbs. cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  18 compost bins; 34 bags of clothes

A light traffic week for the market but still 18 bins!!

Saturday, December 7th:  A Czech Christmas Celebration

Bohemian National Hall, 321East 73rd Street, 4-7pm 

It’s all Czech all the time at this  family-friendly get-together highlighting Czech Christmas traditions, including Czech Christmas carols, Christmas-themed arts and crafts, including Czech glass ornaments and decorations, chocolates and sweets, mulled wine and traditional Czech Christmas cookies!!  Free.  For more and to RSVP...

Sunday, December 8th:  Wilderness Medicine and Back Country Safety

Threes Brewing, 333 Douglass, Brooklyn, 12-2pm

Interested in learning how to assess an accident, splint a break or wrap a wound in the backcountry?  This is the clinic for you!!  Free.  For more and to register

Tuesday, December 10th:  Every Other Tuesday Knitting Group

AM Seawright’s Community Office, 1480 York Avenue between 78th & 79th, 2-4pm

Not that it ever wasn’t, but knitting’s having a moment!!  Crocheting, too…  All needlework, in fact!!  So, come and share it along with your community enthusiasms and concerns!!  All genders, ages and skill levels welcome…  (That means you, gentlemen!!)  Just RSVP

And then:

Friday, December 13th:  Deep Energy Retrofit of a Brownstone Tour

Sunset Park, Brooklyn location revealed with your reservation, 2pm

Those attending will learn the steps that were taken to meet a net-zero energy target, improve thermal comfort and air quality, protect the building from moisture, satisfy historic guidelines and stay within the client’s budget!!  That plus advice on how to leverage financing mechanisms for historic rehabilitation and solar tax credits; how upgrades to comfort, air quality, durability, and energy performance at the lowest possible cost!!  Yes!  You, too, can have your very own green brownstone!!  Organized by Northeast Sustainable Energy Association.  Members, $25.  Non-members, $35.  For more and tickets

Saturday, December 14th to Sunday, January 5th:  The 120th Audubon Christmas Bird Count

Across the U.S.A.

Does Audubon ever have the count organized (in a really good way)!!   And birds are so needing our help!!   For all you need to know...

Monday, December 16th:  Movie Monday at the 67th Street Branch Library

328 East 67th Street, 3pm

Showing  “The Goldfinch” this time ’round!!  Free. 

Friday, December 20th:  Christmas with the Strads

Metropolitan Museum, Grace Rainey Auditorium, 1000 FIfth Avenue, 7pm

And we quote, “The Handel+Haydn Society returns to The Met for a special holiday concert featuring festive music by Vivaldi, Charpentier, Biber, Telemann, and others. For this very special occasion, The Met will bring out its famous Stradivarius, “The Gould” Violin, to let it sing once again in the hands of the virtuoso Baroque violinist Aisslinn Nosky of The Handel+Haydn Society.”  Adults, $75.  Children, $1.  For more and tickets

Wednesday, January 1st, 2020:  First Day Hike

All Over New York State

What better way to welcome a new year and decade than being in nature!!  There’ll be some 60 destinations on offer, each offering a special experience!!  Check ’em out!!

Saturday, January 18th:  Subway Art Tour Two

Meeting place revealed with reservation, 1pm

Second in the series with veteran tour guide Phil Desiere leading a journey from 14th Street south into Brooklyn and back to Astor Place…  With commentary and time to savor the art at each of the 10 stops!!  Organized by the Municipal Art Society.  Members, $20.  Non-members, $30.  For more and tickets… 

Activism of the weekend:

Likely you’ve heard about  Lenox Hill/Northwell Hospital’s expansion plans…  (And if you haven’t, here’s the lowdown.)  Should you disapprove, here’s how to weigh in

Fellow NYers in Greenwich Village are facing a similar problem and could use our support

You might also want to thanks CMS Kallos and Powers for co-sponsoring INT 1482, a bill that’d require materials reducing bird strike fatalities be installed on newly constructed or altered buildings!! 

Meanwhile, the EPA’s just approved the use of small cyanide bombs – yes, really, cyanide – to “control” wildlife.  Should you feel this approval should be revoked

And if you feel automakers should retain clean car standards… 

Or that Congress should fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund

Whew!!  On to the miscellany file:

How crazy is our weather??  These blossoms-on-a-tree-in-the-96th-Street-planter-on- November-28th crazy… 

96th Street blossoms

The NYPL’s best books (in many categories) of 2019

The Times had real estate much on its mind this past Sunday…  The shortage of artist studio space in NYC…  And loss of the real estate lobby’s power in Albany…   

Lovely portraits of folks farming sustainably across the U.S.A… 

Not a rhetorical question:  Will Buffalo become a climate change haven…?

Way off the reservation but so fine, the paper also noted the Milwaukee Bucks now include sign language in its postgame press conferences…  

Then critters:

NYC’s most popular dog names…  

An 18,000-year-old puppy…

How much do Russians love cats…??  So much one city’s appointing a special veternarian for its homeless street cats…  This in addition to the street kitties’ official chef…

How devoted to the rescue and rehab of wildlife are a lot of Americans…??   Plenty, of course!!

Our back-and-forth/cold-warm weather seems to be affecting  4 endangered turtle species that summer in our NYC waters…  So should we encounter a lethargic, “cold-stunned” turtle, the NYS Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Stranding Hotline (24-hours) wants us to let them know asap at 631-369-9829… 

Turkeys like suburbs, too

The week in raptor migration:

 

And from the Hudson River Almanac: 

11/19 – Manhattan; We checked our research gear today in Hudson River Park at The River Project’s sampling station on the lighthouse tender Lilac at Pier 25. Our killifish pot again held several very tiny blue crabs (10-20 mm) as well as a pleasant surprise, an American lobster (60 mm). – Siddhartha Hayes, Ashlee Zhang, Chelsea Quaies

American Lobster

That American Lobster!!

[The American lobster (Homarus americanus) has a long and storied cultural history in New England and coastal New York. They are a widely distributed, commonly abundant, crustacean found on the continental shelf and inshore waters from Maine through New Jersey. New York Harbor and the Upper Bay are included in DEC’s Lobster Management Area 4 that includes Montauk Point to the northeast and then southwest to Barnegat Bay, NJ. Commercial and recreational size limits are 3⅜-inches minimum and 5¼-inches maximum carapace length. While the average adult lobster weighs 2.0 pounds, they have been known to grow to 44 pounds and live 45-50-years. – Kim McKown]

[I remember the first time I encountered a live lobster. I was ten years-old and watching watermen set pots and traps off Charlestown Breachway in Rhode Island. One of them dip-netted a huge lobster from a tidepool. The lobster was “green”! My first thought was that the lobster was ill. The waterman explained to me that green was in the range of their natural coloring. I later learned that crustacean exoskeletons become red when they are exposed to heat, either by cooking or prolonged exposure to the sun. – Tom Lake]

11/19Manhattan: Our Randall’s Island Park Alliance staff educators spotted a huge flock of brant covering field #42 (northeast end of Randall’s Island) by the Bronx Kill. We guesstimated their number to be around 300 with a few gulls mixed in. – Jackie Wu

[Brant (Branta bernicla) is a small species of goose. They are seen in the Hudson Valley primarily during spring and fall migration. They winter in Mid-Atlantic coastal areas after breeding in the Canadian Arctic. – Tom Lake]

What would a week be without its Fish:

1/24 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 49 is the white bass (Morone chrysops), number 140 (of 230) on our watershed list of fishes.

white bass

A Trio of White Bass

White bass are one of three river basses (Moronidae) found in the watershed, the others being white perch and striped bass. They are closely related – same genus, different species. White bass can hybridize with striped bass producing a hybrid called “wiper.” They are the only nonnative species of the three originating from the Mississippi and Ohio river systems, and the Great Lakes.

The journey of the white bass to the Hudson River from the Great Lakes probably began sometime after 1825 with the completion of the Erie Canal that connected Lake Erie to the Atlantic Ocean. Another conduit, Oneida Lake, was connected to Lake Ontario via the Oswego Canal in 1828, that was then linked to the Erie Canal in 1835. These were likely the principle paths for the white bass to reach our watershed.

Since their arrival in the Mohawk and Hudson rivers, relatively few white bass have been documented. After nearly 200 years, it might be expected that they would have settled in and found their niche. DEC Fisheries Biologist Jessica Best checked the Region 3 archives and found just two records of white bass: Kingston (1991) and Catskill (2011). Bob Schmidt found 26 more white bass records in the New York State Museum spanning 1976-2000, collected from river miles 37-124, plus one more from the Mohawk River. While these data did not result from an exhaustive search, they still suggest far fewer records of white bass in the watershed than we might expect. Superficially, they resemble white perch and might go unnoticed when collection gear is checked (not unlike confusing young-of-year silver perch for white perch). White bass feed on small fishes and crustaceans and can reach a foot-long. In parts of the southern U.S., they are known colloquially as “sand bass.”

One day in October 1988, on successive casts, Chris Lake caught a striped bass, a white perch, and a white bass on a silver lure in the warm-water outflow of the Danskammer Power Generating Facility (Orange County). That moment, when all three Moronids were there, has seemingly never recurred. So, the question lingers: Why have they not thrived as have some other Erie Canal immigrants? – Tom Lake

 Yours in perpetual greenness,

UGS      

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Dear UESiders, 

Herewith a post-Thanksgiving mini-edition…

Haven’t received the poundage yet, but despite last Sunday’s cold/ soggy/totally unpleasant weather, an astonishing 188 stalwart individuals braved the elements and had their paper shredded to a fair-the-well!! 

Other news??  This past October, the Supreme Court heard a clean water case…  Could be huge.

Further on the subject of H2O, the NYS Division of Water’s Thanksgiving Card

On to the holiday weekend and just beyond:

Saturday, November 30th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

With us will be Bread Alone,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley and Gayeski Farms!!

Yes, American Pride Seafood, SunFed Beef and Ballard’s Honey are taking the weekend off but will be returning next Saturday!!

And you recall, last week was the season’s last for Cherry Lane and Alewife.

But weather depending – as in if it’s not unpleasantly cold – our faithful Master Knife Sharpener will be at her table honing awayl!!

Market Manager Supremo Margaret weighs in: “Yes, it’s our usual quiet post-Thanksgiving market Saturday, but look for another round of great holiday recipes and Ciana’s usual brilliant weekly demo!!”

Last week’s recycling totals:  87 lbs. batteries;  19 lbs. cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  18 compost bins; 45 bags of clothes

Week 3 for 18 bins, you freaking amazing people!!

Monday, December 2nd & December 16th:  Movie Monday at the 67th Street Branch Library

328 East 67th Street, 3pm

Commencing with “Aladdin” on the December 2nd, moving on to “The Goldfinch” on December 16th!!  Free. 

Monday, December 2nd:  “Mind the Wall!” Animated Short Films About 1989

Bohemian National Hall, 321 East 73rd Street, 7pm 

And we quote, “To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Iron Curtain that physically and ideologically divided Europe, we invite you to see a hand-picked selection of top-shelf auteur animated short films.”  Free.  For more and to RSVP

Thursday, December 5th & Tuesday, December 10th:  Free Flu Shots at Lenox Hill Hospital

Hearth Room, 10 East 77th Street, 1-pm on the 5th, 4-7pm on the 10th

Get it done, people!!   Funded by Lenox Hill.  Co-hosted by Congresswoman Maloney, MBP Brewer, SS Krueger, AMs Seawright and Quart and CMs Kallos and Powers.  For more contact Katie Greer at cgreer1@northwell.edu or 212-434-2751.

Friday, December 6th:  Piece by Piece – Puzzles & Periodicals for Adults

328 East 67th Street, 10:30-11:30am

An hour of puzzles to get that gray matter in gear while scanning newspapers and mags and discussing current events!!  Free.  For more

Our best,

UGS

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Happy Thanksgiving, UESiders!!

Thanksgiving meal

Visions of turkey…  The company of family and friends…  Dressing/stufffing…  The Thanksgiving Parade…   Mashed potatoes with buckets of gravy…  The looming allure of Black Friday…  Cranberry sauce and sweet potatoes (maybe even with marshmallows)…  Snoozing-out in front of the TV…  Pumpkin pie…  

And for those of us moved to add volunteering into the Turkey Day/Weekend mix, NYC abounds in wonderful ways to make the day great for folks without our good luck…

But first the week during which we prepare: 

Now to Sunday, January 5th:  Bronx Zoo Holiday Lights Return

2300 Southern Boulevard, The Bronx

And we quote, “For the first time since 200, the Bron Zoo is bringing back the celebrated holiday tradition with dazling lifht displays that cover and sparkle acres of zoo…”  They’re talking wildlife-theme LED displays, custom Asian lanterns and animated light shows and more!!  Adults, $29.95.  Children, $22.95.  Seniors, $28.95.  For more and tickets

Saturday, November 23rd:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

At their tables heaped with Thanksgiving goodness will be American Pride Seafood,  Bread Alone, Ballard Honey,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Cherry Lane, SunFed Beef,  Alewife, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley and Gayeski Farms!!

And, of course, our own Master Knife Sharpener will be present to get those knives turkey-ready!!

Market Manager Ciana adds:  “Sorry to say this is the last 2019 Saturday for two of 82nd Street’s beloved producers – Cherry Lane Farm and Ale Wife Farm…  Meaning this weekend couldn’t be more perfect for stocking up on Cherry Lane and Ale Wife’s fantastic produce!!  And, at the Info Tent, I’ll have plenty of holiday recipes for one and all and be cooking up something delicious with seasonal squashes and root vegetables!!”

Last week’s recycling totals:  102 lbs. batteries;  24 lbs. cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  5 pairs of eyeglasses;  1 make-up wand; 18 compost bins; 40 bags of clothes

Yes, people, ANOTHER 18 bins!!  UES composters rule!!

Sunday, November 24th:  92nd Street Greenmarket

First Avenue at 92nd Street, 9am-3pm

The last Sunday of 92nd Street’s 2019 season…

And with us for this last day will be the great people of American Pride Seafood,  Meredith’s Bakery, Ole Mother Hubbert and Phillips Farms!!

And yes, folks,  the Master Knife Sharpener will there with us, too!! 

Composting totals for 10/20 –  8 bins, 192 composters, 1022 lbs.;  10/27 –  7 bins, 103 composters;  903 lbs. ;  11/2,  11//9 & 11/17 – TBA

Almost 200 composters!!  Unreal, you bright green people!!

Sunday, November 24th:  Shred-A-Thon – Thanksgiving 2019 Edition

92nd Street Greenmarket, First Avenue at 92nd Street 10am-2pm

At last!!  And the last of the season!!  Rain or shine!!  So, bring on that paper, folks!!

 Just remember:

NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings. 

NO HARDCOVER BOOKS.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

(We’re having some ideas for those hardcovers so hold on to them!!)

Yet again, thank you, AM Seawright,  CM Kallos and Powers for making Shred-A-Thons possible!!

Tuesday, November 26th:  Every Other Tuesday Knitting Group

AM Seawright’s Community Office, 1480 York Avenue between 78th & 79th, 2-4pm

Not that it ever wasn’t, but knitting’s having a moment!!  Crocheting, too…  All needlework, in fact!!  So, come and share it along with your community enthusiasms and concerns!!  All genders, ages and skill levels welcome…  (That means you, gentlemen!!)  Just RSVP

Fast approaching:

Tuesday, December 3rd:  Giving Tuesday

On a computer near you…

The annual opportunity for ever generous UESiders to underscore their concern for those in need!!

Sunday, December 8th:  Schurz Park Holiday Tree Lighting

East End Avenue at 86th Street, 5pm

We quote and it’s so true, “A cherished, family tradition: carols, Cantori Choir, Orbital Brass, candlelight, candy canes, hot chocolate… And an evening your family will cherish for years to come.  Held snow, rain or balmy weather!!”

Monday, December 9th:  Handel’s “Messiah” at Hunter College

Hunter College Assembly Hall, North Building, 69th Street between Park  Lexington Avenues, 7:30pm 

The wonderful voices of the Hunter College Choir…  Soloists Amy Justman, Raehann Bryce-Davis Nicholas Simpson and Kenneth Overton…  Concert directed by maestro Michael Sheetz…  All that and it’s totally free!!  

Sunday, December 15th:  Volunteer Landscaping at Ridgewood Reservoir

Meet at the parking lot,  Vermont Place, Brooklyn, 10am

And we quote, “Join NYC H2O and the NYC Parks Department as we remove invasive plants from the path around the reservoir. The reservoir is a beautiful home to 175 species of plants but many are invasive. For this project we will focus on removing mugwort on the causeway between basins 2 and 3.”  (Mugwort!!)  For more and to sign up

On the activism score:

No, the Gov hasn’t yet signed the pesticide bill…  If you’d like to remind him…   

Miscellany with a growing holiday tinge:

Consumer Reports’ all-over-the-map holiday tips…  

Photograph or draw your favorite tree in its fall glory and enter the Arbor Day Contest

Then your favorite 5th graders’ masterpiece in the Arbor Day Poster Contest

Precinct 19 plus a pair of DNA tests equals… 

Camping pic

How about NYS DEC holiday Camping Gift Cards

3D print out homes

A bit of lowdown on NYS mosses and non-mosses

Recycling as a lifestyle…   If you’re a Trash Pirate, yes!!

NYS Conservation Officers had hands full with a deer rescue this week…

And the original purpose of bubble was…  Wallpaper!!

Critter time:

Commencing with some not-so great news about Peconic scallops

Federal Court’s just ruled our Federal Fisheries are inadequately  protecting endangered right whales…  (Shape up guys!!) 

Eeek!!  Australian fires are yet another threat to ever adorable koalas

Going brighter:

The Hawaiian Duck’s remarkable comeback from looming extinction

As our cities become pollinator havens

Underscoring that point, there’s Bee City USA

Yup, you’re reading this right…  Scientists need your dog’s help

This week’s migratory numbers are::

The latest from the Hudson River Almanac and our part of the Hudson River where jellyfish seem to abound:

10/25 – Brooklyn:  Today was another “new jelly” spotting on the East River at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Middle school students from Manhattan came to learn about the intertidal zone as we went out to Pebble Beach at low tide for beach combing. Students found Asian shore crabs, periwinkle snails, scuds (Gammarus), and algae, but the highlight was a large stranded lion’s mane jellyfish. Once we ensured that it was safe to touch, we allowed students to feel and investigate. – Christina Tobitsch, Shad Hopson

lion's mane jellyfish

That Lion’s Mane Jellyfish

[The lion’s mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata) is the largest known species of jellyfish in the world. They use their stinging tentacles to capture prey such as fish and smaller jellyfish. The tentacles of larger lion’s mane jellyfish can reach 100-feet in length and they can attain a bell diameter of over six-feet, although most are far smaller. In July 2008, swarms of lion’s mane jellyfish were reported in the Hudson River off Manhattan’s west side. – Tom Lake]

10/22 – Brooklyn, New York City: Eighty eighth-grade students from Brooklyn Heights joined Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy educators on the East River at the Pier 4 beach for seining and water quality testing as a part of the annual Day-in-the-Life of the River. Among the fishes, high count was Atlantic silverside (584); others included bay anchovy, winter flounder, northern pipefish, and Atlantic menhaden. In addition, hermit crab, ribbed mussel, moon jellyfish, and several Beroe’s and Leidy’s comb jellies were collected. Though Beroe’s comb jellies have been previously caught in our 12-year seining history, this marks the first time we have specifically recorded both Beroe’s and Leidy’s comb jellies at the same time. – Christina Tobitsch

Beroe's Comb Jellyfish

A Beroe’s Comb Jelly

10/23 – Brooklyn, New York City: Volunteers performed a coastal clean-up this morning on the East River at Pebble Beach in Brooklyn Bridge Park. As they were collecting trash that had been left by the tide, volunteers noticed large transparent plastic-looking shapes. There were 5-6 of them and they varied in size from 3-5-inches in diameter. They appeared to have been washed up on the rocks and left behind as the tide went out. After some research, we discovered that they too belonged to the genus Aequorea, probably the many-ribbed hydromedusa (Aequorea aequorea). – Elizabeth Harnett, Christina Tobitsch

Many-Ribbed Aquafioria

A Many-Ribbed Aequorea

11/6 – Manhattan, HRM 1: Once again, we checked our research sampling gear in Hudson River Park at The River Project’s sampling station on the lighthouse tender Lilac at Pier 25 and were delighted to find a young-of-year striped bass (80 mm). A double treat was a feather blenny (60 mm), a fish we see only a few times a year.  – Siddhartha Hayes, Meagan Fontanez, Chelsea Quaies

feather blenny

A Feather Blenny

[The feather blenny (Hypsoblennius hentz) is a small, scaleless, seasonally resident marine fish with fleshy cirri (“feathers”) on their head. Their lower jaw has a row of small, close-set teeth like those of a comb, thus their family name, combtooth blennies (Blenniidae). Blennies are benthic dwellers where they often burrow in the soft bottom or find refuge in old mollusk shells. It was added to our watershed fish list in August 1994 from a feather blenny caught at The River Project (Pier 41) in Manhattan. Tom Lake]

11/8 – Manhattan, HRM 1: We finished our sampling week by checking our research gear in Hudson River Park at The River Project’s sampling station on the lighthouse tender Lilac at Pier 25. To our surprise, we caught our second feather blenny in two days, this one slightly larger (80 mm). Young-of-year striped bass were high count (7) in the killifish pot (65-80 mm). Rounding out a fabulous catch was a beautiful black sea bass (90 mm). – Siddhartha Hayes, Nina Hitchings

11/9 – New York Harbor: We were on the Capitol Princess fishing boat out of the East River with Captains Richard and Eric Collins. On board were the awesome environmental educators from Randall’s Island Park’s Alliance, Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy, City Parks Foundation, Battery Park City Parks, and the Lower East Side Ecology Center, who work tirelessly for the East River. After passing through the Upper Bay of New York Harbor, we began fishing along the inshore waters outside the Verrazano Narrows. The action was slow, but we did manage to catch a few tautog. On our way back into the Upper Bay, we came upon a striped bass feeding frenzy – they were blitzing Atlantic menhaden. We caught several of them, one of which was 20 pounds. – Peter Park, Chris Girgenti, Luis Gonzalez, Marieke Bender, Isa Del Bello, Kellan Stanner

20 Pound Bass

With That 20 Pound Bass

But none of the above are Fish of the Last Two Weeks:

11/2 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 47 is the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus), number 78 (of 230) on our watershed list of fishes.

bullhead

A Bullhead

The brown bullhead is one of eight species of catfish (Ictaluridae) found in the watershed and is considered a native species. Within the eight catfishes, three are bullheads, the others being the yellow bullhead (A. natalis) and the white catfish (A. catus). Four other catfishes are much smaller, including tadpole, margined, and brindled madtoms, as well as the stonecat. The eighth species, channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), was introduced from the Midwest and Mississippi watershed.

The brown bullhead, like most catfish, favors the bottom of ponds, lakes, and rivers feeding on benthic orgasms from crustaceans to small fishes. Their brown chin barbels serve as sense organs providing both touch and taste helping them to navigate in low-light conditions. While brown bullheads can get to be a foot-long, most of those we see are smaller.  –  Tom Lake

11/13 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 48 is the white perch (Morone americana), number 141 (of 230) on our watershed list of fishes. 

A White Perch

A White Perch

White perch are one of three River Basses (Moronidae) found in the watershed and are very closely related to both striped bass and white bass. Physiologically, they do well in an estuary if given time to acclimate to water ranging from salt to brackish to fresh. They are native to the Atlantic slope from Canada to South Carolina with a center of abundance between the Hudson River and Chesapeake Bay. While they can reach 18-inches, those we see in the Hudson River are a foot-long or less.

Several years ago, as I was sampling Hudson River tidewater tributaries in the spring documenting fish populations, my net seemed to be catching an inordinately high number of “fat-bellied” white perch. I wrote off the first dozen or two as gravid females until it seemed like there were no males at all. Finally, with a Roy C. Ketcham high school class assisting, we did some invasive surgery and discovered that the stomachs of every “gravid” white perch was filed with glass eels (juvenile American eels). Glass eels, in from the sea each spring, surge into many tributaries from March through May creating robust forage for many predators. – Tom Lake

11/15 – Manhattan: We found 42 species of birds today in Central Park. Highlights included a late-date summer tanager, an orange-crowned warbler, a hairy woodpecker, a pied-billed grebe (first-of-season), American kestrel, 165 northern shovelers, and a female eastern bluebird. The eastern bluebird was found by Sol Shamilzade and was one of two bluebirds in the area. – Robert DeCandido, Deborah Allen

summer taninger

A Summer Tanager

May all our turkeys be green,

UGS

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Happy America Recycles Week, UESiders!!

And apropos of the composting news from 82nd Street and Robbins Plaza, we’re  celebrating in a totally perfect way!! 

Meanwhile…

It’s also Human-Animal Relationship Awareness Week…

baby red panda

(Wouldn’t at all mind having a relationship with this baby red panda furriness  found on Zooborns, a site devoted to young life in zoos worldwide and beloved by many kids of all ages…)    

Turning to the non-furbearing, it’s also Manatee Awareness Month!!

Meanwhile, the Holland Tunnel – the first under water tunnel constructed in the U.S. – opened on November 13th, 1927!! 

Then there’s the week ahead: 

Saturday, November 16th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82nd Street between First and York, 9am–2pm

Compost & Clothes Collection, 9am–1pm

With us will be will be American Pride Seafood,  Bread Alone, Ballard Honey,  Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Cherry Lane, SunFed Beef,  Alewife, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley and Gayeski Farms!!

Yes, and the Master Knife Sharpener will back and ready to get your cutlery ready for Thansgiving carving!!

Market Manager Ciana adds:  “This week, I’ll have plenty Thanksgiving/Holiday recipes available for one and all…  And I’ll be cooking up some market stuffing for inspiration!!  Oh, also, in two weeks Ale Wife Farm will be finishing for their  season at 82nd, so now’s the time to stock up all the beautiful bounty they have left!!”

Last week’s recycling totals:  81 lbs. batteries;  18 lbs. cords, corks, cellphones and cartridges;  7 pairs of eyeglasses;  1 make-up wand; 18 compost bins; 44 bags of clothes

Yes, people, 18 bins…  All-time record time!!

Sunday, November 17th:  92nd Street Greenmarket

First Avenue at 92nd Street, 9am-3pm

At their tables will be American Pride Seafood,  Meredith’s Bakery, Ole Mother Hubbert, Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!

Plus, you lucky shoppers, the Master Knife Sharpener will be back with us, totally ready and able to hone!! 

Recycling totals for 10/27, 11/2  11//9 – TBA

Tuesday, November 19th:  Every Other Tuesday Knitting Group

AM Seawright’s Community Office, 1480 York Avenue between 78th & 79th, 2-4pm

Not that it ever wasn’t, but knitting’s having a moment!!  Crocheting, too…  All needlework, in fact!!  So, come and share it along with your community enthusiasms and concerns!!  All genders, ages and skill levels welcome…  (That means you, gentlemen!!)  Just RSVP

Recycling totals for 10/27, 11/3 & 11/10 – TBA

And next week:

Sunday, November 24th:  Shred-A-Thon – Thanksgiving 2019 Edition

92nd Street Greenmarket, First Avenue at 92nd Street 10am-2pm

As ever, keep in mind:

NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings. 

NO HARDCOVER BOOKS.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

(We’re having some ideas for those hardcovers so hold on to them!!)

Our thanks to CM Powers and Kallos and AM Seawright for their generous Shred-A-Thons grants!!

Gear up for a fun December:

Now to Sunday, February 23rd, 2020:  “Yeti, Set, Snow!!”

Swedish Marionette Cottage, Central Park, West 79th Street & West Drive

What happens when a young girl and her friend encounter a yeti named Pascetti and a cat, Tinsel Kitty, on the first snow day…??  Lots of puppet fun for families with young children, that’s what!!  $8-$12.  For more and tickets

Friday & Saturday, December 6th & 7th:  Mount Vernon Hotel Museum Holiday Candlelight Tours

421 East 61st Street, 6:15pm & 7:30pm 

The Museum describes it best, “Step into the holiday season of 1830 with a magical tour of the museum by candlelight.   Enjoy popular refreshments and confections of the time while listening to classical and holiday music…”  Members, $10.  Non-members, $15.  Children under 12, $5.  For tickets

Sunday, December 8th:  Schurz Park Holiday Tree Lighting

East End Avenue at 86th Street, 5pm

We quote and it’s so true, “A cherished, family tradition: carols, Cantori Choir, Orbital Brass, candlelight, candy canes, hot chocolate… And an evening your family will cherish for years to come.  Held snow, rain or balmy weather!!”

Monday, December 9th:  Handel’s “Messiah” at Hunter College

Hunter College Assembly Hall, North Building, 69th Street between Park  Lexington Avenues, 7:30pm 

The wonderful voices of the Hunter College Choir…  Soloists Amy Justman, Raehann Bryce-Davis Nicholas Simpson and Kenneth Overton…  Concert directed by maestro Michael Sheetz…  All that and it’s totally free!!  

Saturday, December 16th & Sunday, December 17th:  Salon du Chocolat New York

Javits Center, 655 West 34th Street  

And we quote:  “A unique global pageantry of chocolatiers, artisans, pastry chefs, experts, and businesses throughout the world who have one thing in common: their passion for all things chocolate…”  As in a chocolate fashion show,  chocolate sculpture, experiental chocolate selfie stations, chocolate workshops…  What could be bad??  Adults:  $25 online, $35 at the door.  Children 6-12:  $10 online, $12 at the door.  Children under 6:  Free.   For more, hours and tickets…  

As always, some activist items:

Yes, we’ve been here before but the threat persists…  So, if you oppose mining in the Grand Canyon

Now the Williams Pipeline are wanting to dump their waste in NYC waters!!  So, should you think this a poor idea… 

Humm… If you’d like to encourage our governor to sign the Save the Species Bill…  (No, he still hasn’t.)

You might also want to let the Governor know you also think he should sign the bill banning the pesticide chlorpyrifos… 

Why do we oppose the Keystone Pipeline??  How about 2 oil spills in 2 years…  The last more than 380,000 gallons worth into wetlands…

And miscellany:

Ten best places to take in fall color in our Central Park

Time-of-use power charging (lower in off-hours) and why more and more green people are doing laundry at night

A step forward in recycling/reuse pesky thermo-form plastics (like clam shells) right here in the USA…

Great NYState/Black Friday hikes

Amazing New Year’s Day hikes, too…

Then there’s the world’s longest hike…  As in 14,864 miles long!!

Who knew fertilizing your lawn between December 1st and April 1st is against NYS law!!  (And when/if you do fertilize, what you use should be fertilizer free!)

Say what??  Good a Tennessee company’s pushing carpet recycling…  But that the result might be used in cosmetics and opthalmics

Not so enthusiastic about a new wood pellet burning/biomass heating system in 3 NYS buildings…   

On the other hand,  NYS just recognized the NY Botanical Garden for its “ongoing commitment to renewable energy, sustainability, conservation, research, and education” with a New York State Environmental Excellence Award!! 

Hey, but we can all get a better grip on our power use…  Our household vampire energy eaters…  And how to rein ’em in…  

Bring on the animals:

A baby pangolin thrives after a poacher attack…

Two injured peregrine falcons return to the skies above NYC… 

Could be animal…  Could be plant… Could be fungus…  What we do know is it’s NYS’s own super slime, physarum polycephalum!

Armadillos and their world

Winners of the National Wildlife Magazine’s 2019 photo contest

Last week’s migration totals:

A week of discovery in the Hudson River Almanac:

11/1 – Manhattan, New York City: During our Randall’s Island seining at Little Hell Gate saltmarsh today, Randall’s Island Park Alliance Staff Educators captured some hydromedusae jellyfish (small, transparent or lightly pigmented jellyfish). After a bit of research, it was determined that these were most likely white-cross jellyfish (Staurophora mertensi).  However, since the catch occurred significantly outside the documented range of the white-cross jellyfish – Arctic waters south to Rhode Island (Gosner 1978) – we referred the question and accompanying photos to an expert. – Jackie Wu

hydromeuse

White-Cross Jellyfish

[While I was initially skeTptical, thinking these were more likely to be young Aurelia aurita (moon jellyfish), I now concur. The white cross on this species is very diagnostic. An initial stumbling block was size: white-cross jellyfish adults have bell diameters of 8-10-inches. However, the white-cross jellyfish young can be 36 millimeters (mm), or smaller, as these appear to be. – Jim Edward Rice]

10/23Manhattan: Students on a school field trip enjoyed our Hudson River Park Estuary Lab catch-and-release rod and reel fishing program at Pier 40 in Hudson River Park. During the program they caught four amazing fish, including two black sea bass (6-7-inches) and two striped bass (7-8-inches). – Olivia Radick

10/30Manhattan: Our winter field trips had begun at the Hudson River Park’s Estuary Lab in Hudson River Park. Today, was the first trip in a series of five for a group of fifth-graders from Manhattan P.S. 86. We began with an introduction to the estuary followed by an opportunity to catch and release fish on Pier 40. By far, the highlight of the fishing was two hickory shad that students caught (9-10-inches).
These were our program’s first hickory shad. – Olivia Radick

hickory shad

A Hickory Shad

[Hickory shad (Alosa mediocris), like American shad (A. sapidissima), are anadromous, in that they are ocean fish that return to their natal rivers in spring to spawn. They are uncommon seasonal visitors in the Hudson River estuary being far more common in their home range from Chesapeake Bay to Georgia. Their trivial name (mediocris) translates from Latin as “ordinary, mediocre.” This may have been the opinion of Samuel Mitchill (1814), the ichthyologist who gave the fish its scientific name, referring to their supposed poor culinary quality. At points south along the Atlantic Coast, commercial operations used to separate hickory shad from American shad because their market price was far less. I have smoked hickory and would rate them below American shad for taste, but considerably above gizzard shad and Atlantic menhaden. Tom Lake]

But the Fish of the Week is:

Fish-of-the-Week for Week 46 is the comely shiner (Notropis amoenus), number 50 (of 230) on our watershed list of fishes.

comely shiner

A Comely Shiner

The comely shiner is a native species, one of 34 minnows (Cyprinidae), the largest family of fishes in the watershed (15%). Their range extends along the Atlantic Coastal Plain from New York to North Carolina.  C. Lavett Smith (1985) describes their preferred habitat as “moderate-sized to larger streams.” Lee, et al. (1980) notes those locations and adds rivers as well.  Its trivial name, amoenus, is Latin for pleasant, or delightful, thus comely (“pleasant to look at”).  Despite all this flattery, the comely shiner is a rather small (to 88 mm), unpretentious minnow easily confused with other somewhat nondescript relatives.  –  Tom Lake

Happiness is greenness in all ways,

UGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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