Dear UESiders, 

So…

Been almost two years – think August-September 2019 –  since we last took a break…

But only lately have we been feeling a bit weary…

So…

Time for some This Week at the Markets vacay!!

BUT…

That down time commences next week, so:

Saturday, July 24th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

Barring one of our brilliant farmers/fisherman/beekeepers/bakers/
flower growers taking the rarest Saturday off, with us will be the fantastic American Pride Seafood, Ballard Honey, Bread Alone, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski  Farms!!


(Yes, you read it right!!  Ballard Honey returns this weekend!!)

So what of our Master Knife Sharpener??  For the time being, she’s on an every other Saturday schedule..   Meaning she’ll next be back and getting up to her sharpening magic come next Saturday, July 31st around 9am!!  Then Saturdays, August 14th and August 28th!! 

Of course, we’ll send out special flash should her schedule change!!


Then:

Sunday, July 25th:  92nd Street Greenmarket 
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

At their groaning-with-goodness tables will be the great folks of American Pride Seafood, Sikking Flowers, Ole Mother Hubbert,  Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!

Okay, so we’ve always been down right wimpy on the kimchee score…  Until last Sunday, that is…  Who’d have thought it’d be  fantastic with french fries?!!  And who knows what else…??!!

Upcoming actual events:

Throughout the Season: Free Summer Movies
In Parks Citywide

Check ’em out!!

Throughout the Season:  Tree Identification Workshops

Meet at  Naturalists Gate, Central Park West at 79th

Calling all aspiring dendrologists!!  How to ID and what the essentials are about the 100 “must know” trees with Carey Russell of the Dendro Lab!!   $10 per workshop.  For dates, times and more… 
 

Saturday, July  24th:   Marble Hill Walking Tour
Meet at Marble Hill, Broadway at 225th Street, 11am

NYC H2O strikes again with a tour that’ll answer the question…  “How did part of Manhattan become joined to the Bronx by moving a river?”  $30.  For the complete lowdown and tickets

Monday, July 26th:  No-Cost Screening Mammograms for Eligible Women 
Mobile Scan Van in front of AM Seawright’s office, 1485 York between 78th & 79th

Free and sponsored by Assembly Member Seawright!!  To determine your eligibility and make an appointment, just call 646-415-7932…

Saturday, July 31st:   All About Bats Walk

Meet at Central Park West & 81st Street, 7pm

Another great walk from our equally great Urban Park Rangers!!  Free.  For more and health safety measures required

Tuesday, August 3rd:  19th Precinct National Night Out Against Crime
John Jay Park,  77th Street and Cherokee Place, 5-8pm


And we quote, “Come celebrate NYC’s reopening with the NYPD, the 19th Precinct Community Council, and your neighbors to build a stronger, safer community. There will be food, raffles, and entertainment for the whole family. The first 200 people to arrive will receive an extra special treat!”  

Friday, August 6th Historic Neighborhood Walking Tour 

Mount Vernon Hotel Museum, 421 East 61st Street, 3pm

Explore the lower UESide neighborhood and learn about its 19th Century people and places…  A not so long ago time when the area was primarily countryside!!  Free to Museum members.  Non-members, $10.  To RSVP (a must)…

Saturday, August 14th to Sunday August 22nd:  5 NYC Homecoming Concerts

One in Each Borough, Each Jam-Packed with Musical Mega Stars

And all will soon be revealed!!  To get on the info mailing list..
.

Virtual events as well:

Every Thursday,  2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

Join the virtual crafting circle of warm, interesting and fun UESide  neighbors and share your community and knitting interests…  All skill levels welcome…  As are gentlemen!!   To RSVP… 

Friday, July 30th, 3pm:  Hearst Fellows Virtual Symposium on Zoom

Join this year’s Mount Vernon Hotel Museum’s Hearst Fellows as they present their original research and programming about New York City in the 19th Century.  Free to members.  Non-members, $10.  To reserve your place

Wednesday, August 11th, 6:30pm:  Undercurrents: Exploring Pools as a Lens to the Water System on Zoom

NYC architect and educator Karolina Czeczek explores public pools as a lens to the NYC water system!!  Another gem organized by the great NYC H2O!!  Free.  For more and to register
 

Many a diversion to take you through coming weeks:

As if that sinkhole wasn’t enough craziness for 87th Street…  Restaurant Week participants… A stolen Albany bus and NYS Environmental Conservation Police…  White water training for our Forest Rangers…  A ton of outdoor adventures on offer in this NYState…  The UESide’s noisiest locales… The NYC winner of the 2021 Champion of Trees Award (scroll down a tad)…  A step towards making sure NYS glass is actually recycled…  A woman who saved a whole lot birds…  Thinking of going EV?…   Satellites spotting microplastics…  What makes a good beach towel…  The (amazing) Ocean Week in review

Next up…  The Hudson River Almanac:

7/7 – Town of Esopus: On a morning river walk, I came upon a freshly washed-up, 6-foot 5-inch Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus) on the shore. Because Atlantic sturgeon are a federally endangered species, the DEC was contacted. We checked but we could not find any sign of boat trauma (prop or collision). We took its measurements and checked for PIT tags, of which there were none.

Atlantic sturgeon
That Atlantic Sturgeon

These prehistoric-looking fish have rows of “boney” plates (modified scales) called scutes and an inferior mouth situated below its snout that essentially vacuums food from the river bottom. Atlantic sturgeon reach maturity and begin to spawn every other year, at about twenty years of age. This one was estimated to be about 25 years-old and weighed about 90 pounds. Atlantic sturgeon have been abundant in coastal estuaries, including the Hudson, at various times but have repeatedly been a victim of commercial over-harvesting.  – Mario Meier

Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) is a small radio transponder that contains a specific code, that allows individual fish to be assigned a unique 10–15-digit alphanumeric identification number. Unlike acoustic tags that actively send out a signal, these are “passive” and do not require a battery. Rather than the tag transmitting a signal, the tag scanner (or reader) sends out a radio frequency and, when a tag is within range, it will relay the identification code back to the receiver. Tom Lake]

For more information on reporting if a dead sturgeon is found, visit:  https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/37121.html

Then there’s the Fish of the Week:


7/8 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 128 is the smooth puffer (Lagocephalus laevigatus), number 233 (of 234) on our watershed list of fishes. 

Smooth puffer
A Couple of Puffers

The smooth puffer is classified as a tropical marine stray to our watershed. They have an overall range of Massachusetts to Brazil but are primarily common in the tropical reach of their range where they occasionally enter estuaries. The smooth puffer is considered rare north of Cape Hatteras. They feed on various species of fish and shrimp and can reach 23 inches in length.

Puffers (Tetraodontidae) have developed an unusual physical adaptation for survival from predators. They are a relatively slow and sluggish fish, so out-swimming danger would rarely be successful. When puffers sense “danger,” a difficult-to-define condition, they immediately ingest water (and some air) to inflate their stomachs. Most puffers are a prickly-skinned fish and, once inflated, they become a ball of trouble for many predators to swallow. Our northern puffer (Sphoeroides maculatus), when inflated, looks very much like a prickly yellow tennis ball.

New York State Ichthyologist Bryan Weatherwax found six smooth puffer records in the New York State Museum fish collection. One of the records was from the estuary, an 1848 record of a smooth puffer caught in the Hudson River off Sing Sing (now Ossining) by Joakin Urmey. This may be the only record of a smooth puffer in the Hudson River, and the reason why the species made its way onto our Hudson River Fish List.

A fish may seem to be rare only because it is rarely reported. There are anecdotal accounts of smooth puffer being caught occasionally by surf anglers on the south shore of Long Island and along the New Jersey Coast. To the angler, they would be thought of as a nuisance taking bait meant for striped bass or bluefish and may be dismissed as unimportant and not likely to be reported.

Warning: The smooth puffer is one of several tropical puffers that contain Saxitoxin, an alkaloid neurotoxin poison that can cause serious illness if ingested. In the smooth puffer, STX is found in the fish’s skin and viscera. – Tom Lake

Then there’s the Bird of the Week:

Northern Gannet on nest with plastic. Photo by Ondrej Prosicky, Shutterstock

The Northern Gannet

Just 100 more green days till the Glasgow Climate Talks!!

Until September,  

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week:  So China’s embargoed Australian coal…  So guess who they’re buying it from now…  Right and to our shame!!  America-to-China coal shipments rose 748% in 4th quarter 2020…  Yes, and we’re selling the stuff all over the globe… 

Eco Tip of the Week:  Drop those washed clean mascara wands into the mail to Appalachian Wild Refuge, P.O. Box 824, Candler, NC 28715.

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Happy Many Days of Intense Humidity and Negative Air Quality, UESiders!!

And how ’bout that huge sinkhole on 89th!!

Not that any of that even vaguely dampens our enthusiasm for what’s going on at our markets and hood, commencing with:

Saturday, July 17th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

At their tables will be our friends American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley, Gajeski Farms and our Master Knife Sharpener!!

Yes!!  The one and only genius of all of all things with a cutting edge, Master Knife Sharpener Barbara Hess returns to 82nd Street this Saturday!!

(You’ll be needing those edges ready for preparing the flood of beautiful produce now piled high on tables at both our markets!!)

And as you likely also noticed, Ballard Honey’s missing from this weeks’ line-up…  Reason being Mr. Ballard’s giving himself and family some well-deserved vacation time!!

Then the next day:

Sunday, July 18th:  92nd Street Greenmarket 
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

With us will be the great folks of American Pride Seafood, Sikking Flowers, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!

Advice:  Better bring an extra (reusable) bag for carrying your share of all the goodness heaped on their tables home!!  You’ll be needing it!!
  
Super Suprema Manager Margaret’s weighs in:

Dear Greenmarketeers:

Corn!!  Tomatoes!!  Summer squashes of many kinds!!  Eggplants!!  Lettuces!! Carrots!!  Peaches!! Blueberries!!  Cherries!!  Apricots!!

Deep breath…


At both markets, we’ve reached that time of year when there is so much beautiful produce it’s almost overwhelming!!  (But the kind of overwhelming we just love!!)  

As ever, a huge thank you to those who help us out by not parking on the west end of 82nd on Saturdays!!

Happy and healthy shopping to one and all,

Margaret

As for other live/in-person events: 

Monday, July 19th to Sunday, August 20th:  Restaurant Week 2021
All Over NYC

And we quote, “NYC Restaurant Week is back and better than ever, with lunch and dinner options (entrée + one side) for $21 or $39, plus Signature Dining Experiences (three courses or more) for $125. Indoor and outdoor tables.  Takeout and delivery available.”  For further details

Tuesday, July 20th to Sunday, June 25:  NY Classical Theater presents King Lear
Carl Schurz Park, East End Avenue at 87th Street, 7pm

Yet again, we quote:  “Adapted and directed by Stephen Burdman, the play will feature the optimistic interpretation of Nahum Tate’s 1681 adaptation, which was popular in England for over 150 years until Shakespeare’s original tragic text was restored in 1838,” writes Playbill. “In addition to the ending, several additional scenes from Tate’s version have been incorporated for this production. The Tate version has not been performed in New York City in over 30 years.”  Free but you must RSVP

Thursday, July 22nd:  Evenings on the Esplanade with the Kristina Gitterman Quartet
The Alice Aycock Pavilion, East River Esplanade at 60th Street, 6-7:30pm

A summer evening with classical strings on our soothing Esplanade.  Free.  (Weather permitting.
)


Coming up soon:

Saturday, July  24th:   Marble Hill Walking Tour
Meet at Marble Hill, Broadway at 225th Street, 11am

NYC H2O strikes again with a tour that’ll answer the question…  “How did part of Manhattan become joined to the Bronx by moving a river?”  $30.  For the complete lowdown and tickets

Monday, July 26th:  No-Cost Screening Mammograms for Eligible Women 
Mobile Scan Van in front of AM Seawright’s office, 1485 York between 78th & 79th

Free and sponsored by Assembly Member Seawright!!  To determine your eligibility and make an appointment, just call 646-415-7932…

Saturday, July 31st:   All About Bats Walk

Meet at Central Park West & 81st Street, 7pm

Another great walk from our equally great Urban Park Rangers!!  Free.  For more and health safety measures required

Friday, August 6th:  Historic Neighborhood Walking Tour 

Mount Vernon Hotel Museum, 421 East 61st Street, 3pm

Explore the lower UESide neighborhood and learn about its 19th Century people and places…  A not so long ago time when the area was primarily countryside!!  Free to Museum members.  Non-members, $10.  To RSVP (a must)…On the virtual event roster:

Friday, July 16th, 3:30pm NYS DEC Wildlife Show & Tell on Facebook Live

Featuring a stellar cast of our state’s native reptiles!!  Free, of course.   For more and to watch… 

Thursday, July 22, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

Join the virtual crafting circle of warm, interesting and fun UESide  neighbors and share your community and knitting interests…  All skill levels welcome…  As are guys!!   To RSVP… 

Friday, July 30th, 3pm:  Hearst Fellows Virtual Symposium on Zoom

Join this year’s Mount Vernon Hotel Museum’s Hearst Fellows as they present their original research and programming about New York City in the 19th Century.  Free to members.  Non-members, $10 To reserve your place

As ever, some activism:

If you’d like to encourage our electeds to support Audubon New York’s plan to protect NYC’s wonderful but vulnerable shore birds

On the Esplanade, In the GreenPark Garden

How ’bout some diverting diversions: 

Covanta (the mega corp that transports UES trash to its PA waste-to-energy plants) has just been sold to a Swedish “global investment firm”…  Young hawks test their wings…  UES restaurants and stimulus…  Projected solar energy in NYState…  Further progress on 59th Street Trader Joe’s…   World’s smallest bird eggs…  DNA solves tree crime…  The lowdown on Japanese beetles


Adult beetles gather while feeding on plants, attracted to the volatile compounds released by others chewing on the damaged foliage “like sharks to a blood trail,” said Daniel A. Potter, a professor in the department of entomology at University of Kentucky.

A Bunch of Japanese Beetles!


Leonardo Da Vinci’s living relatives…  Greening the wavesSeating and Moynihan Station…  The eastern songbird epidemic…  NYS Forest Rangers battle the Oregon Bootleg Fire…  EPR  (Extended Producer Responsibility) packaging law picks up speed…  Strange and wonderful bird sounds…  North Carolinian truffles…  The rise of carbontech…    What to see in the July night sky…                                                                             
And from the Hudson River Almanac:

6/27 – New York City: John Nunez, a member of the East River Anglers Fishing Club, was striped bass fishing with cut bunker [Atlantic menhaden] in the East River just west of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge when he caught a smooth puffer (Lagocephalus laevigatus).

Smooth puffer
That Smooth Puffer

This species has a geographic range of New England to Argentina and is generally considered a “tropical marine stray” to our area. (The fish was probably born in warmer southern waters and ended up here via the northward sweeping currents of the Gulf Stream). Given its rarity in our waters, this large adult specimen—more than 15-inches-long—was an extraordinary catch. The fish was safely released. –  Peter Park6/26 – Manhattan: Seining on the waterfront with New York City residents is always a great experience with everyone ready to hop into the water and help haul the net. We spent two hours with  Summer on the Hudson groups of seiners at Fort Washington Park and caught a nice array of species. Among the catch were ten young-of-year winter flounder (60-100 mm), 25 bay anchovies, three young-of-year bluefish, three Atlantic Silverside, 27 mixed-sex blue crabs at all stages of growth, and both sand and shore shrimp.

Winter flounder

That Winter Flounder

However, the big attention grabber was a three-foot-long American eel, a lovely green in color and substantive in girth. The eel had been previously hooked by the look of its mouth but was still ready to rocket out of our grasp as soon as a breakaway opportunity presented itself. – Margie Turrin, Laurel Zaima
 

6/28 – Manhattan, New York City: Our Randall’s Island Park Alliance team went seining today in the Harlem River at our two favorite locations. Our first stop this morning, an hour after low tide, was the Water’s Edge Garden. The river was 71 degrees Fahrenheit, the salinity was 20.0 ppt., and dissolved oxygen (DO) was a reasonable 6.85 parts-per-million.

Summer flounder
That Summer Flounder

Our three seine hauls netted an impressive eight fish species including mummichogs, a male northern pipefish, striped bass (120 mm), Atlantic tomcod (80 mm), bay anchovies (35-80 mm), eleven winter flounder (75 mm), two spot (55 mm), and my very first summer flounder (90 mm) caught in a seine.

Invertebrates were many and varied led by 28 blue crabs (young-of-season), hundreds of sand shrimp (far fewer grass shrimp), 33 mud dog whelk snails, one hermit crab (housed in a mud dog whelk shell), an oyster drill, Lion’s mane jellyfish (about the size of a clementine), and seven comb jellies (the size of a red globe grape).

We seined the Little Hell Gate Salt Marsh in midday where the tide-change had lowered both the salinity to 17.0 ppt. and the DO to 6.56 ppm. We caught fewer fish here, but they included mummichogs (50 mm), bay anchovies, and a single young-of-year spot (45 mm), always a nice catch. Our largest haul was grass shrimp (25) followed by blue crabs (17). Other invertebrate included sand shrimp, 13 mud dog whelk snails, and comb jellies (one was the size of a mini-M&M). – Jackie Wu

Then there’s The Fish of the Week:


7/1 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 127 is the spot (Leiostomus xanthurus), number 190 (of 234) on our watershed list of fishes.

Spot
A Spot

Spot is one of seven members of the drum family (Sciaenidae) in our watershed. Others include freshwater drum, weakfish, silver perch, northern kingfish, Atlantic croaker, and black drum. Except for the freshwater drum, introduced from the Midwest, they are all saltwater species found seasonally in the brackish reach of the estuary. Some of the drums have a highly specialized swim bladder that serves as sound-producing organ. This has led to the colloquial name of “drum.”

A favorite recreational species, spot are small saltwater-brackish-water fish not often exceeding ten-inches or weighing more than a pound. They range from Massachusetts to northern Mexico and are found over sandy or muddy bottoms in coastal waters. Spot feed on worms and small crustaceans.

They have also lent their presence to the lore and legend of Hudson River fishes. A while ago, when I fished commercially for American shad, I began to pay more attention to those who plied their trade on the water. I consistently heard of “Lafayettes” from well-seasoned fishermen. I discovered that this was a colloquial name for an ephemeral fish called the spot. While the name has since faded out of memory, the story remains legendary.

After a long absence, a great “run” of spot came into New York Harbor in 1824, coinciding with a visit from France’s Marquis de Lafayette, a hero of the American Revolution. The Marquis was invited to Manhattan for a parade in his honor to show America’s gratitude for his efforts on behalf of the Colonies in the American Revolution. A further honor was bestowed on the Marquis when Leiostomus xanthurus became known as the “Lafayette.”

In recent times, the presence of spot in the river has been very sporadic as evidenced by a near absence in the New York Bight from the late 1920s until 1976 (Briggs and Waldman 2002:66). Following that return, they all but disappeared again. We now see a few occasionally caught in seines from the lower estuary into the East River. One notable exception occurred in June 2019, when several were caught (34-36 mm) well upriver in our seine at Hathaway’s Glen, Orange County, river mile 62. – Tom Lake

And This Week’s Most Excellent Bird:

With green thoughts of street tree watering,  

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week: Electronic trash rose 21% in the five years to 2019, according to the Global E-waste Statistics Partnership. Collecting and recycling that waste could avoid as much as 80 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent annually—about how much Chile generates in a year. The United Nations expects e-waste  to double between now and 2050!!

Eco Tip of the Week:  Keep recycling those darned batteries (in ziplock bags) at Best Buy, Lexington & 86th!!

2021 Compost Collected at 96th & Lex (from 4/2/2021): 6/4 – 6 bins, 160 Drop-Offs, 1122 lbs.; 6/11 – 6 bins, 200 Drop-Offs,1424 lbs.; 6/18 – 6 bins; 183 drop-offs, 1284 lbs.; 6/25 – 5 bins, 100 drop-offs, 1110 lbs.

2021 TOTALS – 4/2/2021-6/25/21: 58 bins; 1861 Drop-Offs; 12,582 lbs.

2020 TOTALS (1/9/20-3/25/20): 294 bins; 12,522 lbs. (6.5 tons)

2019 TOTALS: 43,417 lbs, (21.7 tons)

2018 TOTALS: 23,231 lbs. (11.65 tons)

 

 

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Happy Two More Rainy Weekend Market Days, UESiders!!

NOT that we care all that much as long as we’re spared Elsa’s rainiest clouds!!

OR as long as our market tables are weighed down with ever more  tomatoes, melons and corn!! 

OR when we contemplate that on the 9 Fridays since April 6th, you UESiders have dropped off 12,582 pounds/6 1/4 tons of compost/organics!!

OR now that DSNY’s announced curbside compost collection for residential buildings’ll be resuming this fall!!  (For the lowdown and how to sign up  And every building must sign up again!!)

On the other hand:

What’s up with the non-return of compost collection at 82nd, 92nd and Robbins Plaza/70th & First??  (You could contact CM Kallos and inquire…)

Meanwhile:

Decidedly unfun but the most unequivocally meaningful we TV viewers can presently consume is the PBS doc “People vs. Agent Orange”…  Well and truly, a must.

(Took years and some doing, but how grateful/relieved are we that NYC’s now banned spraying Round-Up and its kindred in our parks??!!)

Returning to our great markets:

Saturday, July 10th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

With us will be American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski Farms!!

Thank you, 2021 tomatoes, for making this summer’s first gazpacho batch possible!!  We’re grateful to cukes, onions and green peppers, too!!  (Yeah, we added some scapes as well and had some pickled eggs on the side…)  Fingers crossed Cherry Lane’ll still have blueberries to bring this Saturday…  


Sunday, July 11th:  92nd Street Greenmarket
First Avenue at 92nd Street, 9am-3pm

At their tables will be American Pride Seafood, Sikking Flowers, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!  

Why do we keep thinking beets are a fall thing??  (So glad we have ’em now!!)  Love ’em as a side salad (mixed with Mother Hubbbert’s yogurt, s&p and some horse radish) with Halal’s sirloin steak!!  Maybe some kimchee, too!!

Add these actual, live events:

Saturday, July 10th:  High Bridge Walking Tour
Meet at the High Bridge, 2301 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan, 11am

Yet another great walking tour from NYC H2O…  This time, a foray round, about and on the High Bridge, NYC’s oldest standing bridge, engineering treasure dating from 1848 and once the vital link between the Croton Aqueduct and Bronx/Manhattan faucets!!  $30.  For more and to register

Sunday, July 11th:  Great Trees of Central Park Hike
Meet at West 100 Street and Central Park West, 2pm

Quoting our Urban Park Rangers: “Trees have a special place in our environment. Join us for a hike of Central Park in search of different species and learn some ways to identify these trees during the summer season.”  Free.  For required safety/health measures and more… 

Then there’re the virtual events:

Thursday, July 15th:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

A soothing high-point of any week…  Add to the neighbors you know…  Chat…  Share community interests and concerns…  Knit up a storm…  To RSVP… 

Tuesday, July 20th to Sunday, June 25:  NY Classical Theater presents King Lear
Carl Schurz Park, East End Avenue at 87th Street, 7pm

And we quote:  “Adapted and directed by Stephen Burdman, the play will feature the optimistic interpretation of Nahum Tate’s 1681 adaptation, which was popular in England for over 150 years until Shakespeare’s original tragic text was restored in 1838,” writes Playbill. “In addition to the ending, several additional scenes from Tate’s version have been incorporated for this production. The Tate version has not been performed in New York City in over 30 years.”  Free but you must RSVP

Thursday, July 22nd:  Evenings on the Esplanade with the Kristina Gitterman Quartet
The Alice Aycock Pavilion, East River Esplanade at 60th Street, 6-7:30pm

A summer evening with classical strings on our soothing Esplanade.  Free.  (Weather permitting.
)

Saturday, July  24th:   Marble Hill Walking Tour
Meet at Marble Hill, Broadway at 225th Street, 11am

NYC H2O strikes again with a tour that’ll answer the question…  “How did part of Manhattan become joined to the Bronx by moving a river?”  $30.  For the complete lowdown and tickets

Monday, July 26th:  No-Cost Screening Mammograms for Eligible Women 
Mobile Scan Van in front of AM Seawright’s office, 1485 York between 78th & 79th

Free and sponsored by Assembly Member Seawright!!  To determine your eligibility and make an appointment, just call 646-415-7932…

Saturday, July 31st:   All About Bats Walk

Meet at Central Park West & 81st Street, 7pm

Another great walk from our equally great Urban Park Rangers!!  Free.  For more and health safety measures required

Friday, August 27th:  First UESide Plant Swap

67th Street Library Branch Garden , 328 East 67th Street, 5-7pm

Plans are afoot for the 67th Street and 53rd Street Libraries to team up for a first ever neighborhood Plant Swap!!  Both indoor and outdoor plants will be welcome.  Stay tuned for further details…

Then there’re the virtual events:

Thursday, July 15th, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

A soothing high-point of any week…  Add to the neighbors you know…  Chat…  Share community interests and concerns…  Knit up a storm…  To RSVP… 

At your convenience:  Landscape Painting Tutorial with Eliana Perez, hosted by the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum  via Vimeo

Artist Eliana Perez shares her inspiration, tools, and process for painting landscapes en plein air…  Outside in the Mount Vernon Hotel’s Museum’s lovely garden.  Free.  Here’s the link…   And to view the Museum’s new virtual exhibition which includes Ms. Perez’s work

Ever more diverting diversions:

NYC budget bucks en route to the UESide…  Pesticide also on NYS Conservation Officers’ dance cards…  While our Forest Rangers make a white-knuckle rescue… NYS upgrading/refining what-can-be-recycled terminology/rules…  Plants to steer clear of…  NYC’s next generation MTA cars… What to pack for the perfect picnic…  Those wonderful, weed-munching goats return to Riverside Park…  Our NYS DEC wants us to report where we see a moose...

.Moose in water
A Moose!!


The 91st Street MTS as chronicled by Sanitation’s official photographer (believe it!!)…  A 1081-year-old American tree…  And NYC’s new, Maya Lin-designed “Ghost Forest…  Why trees are rightfully deemed vital infrastructure  (Thanks to reader Susan Blackwell for keeping us tree conscious!!)…  The Argentine city that’s turning urban spaces into farms… Critter IQs


Next stop…  The Hudson River Almanac:

6/25 – Albany:  An extremely rare plant that was only known to exist in Dutchess County, and not seen since 1923, suddenly sprouted up in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve. Albany Pine Bush steward and botanist Jesse Hoffman announced the discovery of the rare, New York State-endangered, Virginia Marbleseed (Lithospermum virginianum) growing in the wild among other plants. It is unclear how the two new plants suddenly popped up after 100 years of extirpation from the region. The Virginia Marbleseed historically grew in the Karner hamlet of Albany but has not been documented there since 1923.

Virginia marbleseed
The Virginia Marbleseed

The plant can be identified by spiraling flower buds and its hard and shiny seeds. These white seeds look like a stone, which is why the plant is named “Marbleseed.” This discovery gives hope that the rare plant may be discovered in other areas of the Hudson Valley. Those weeds in your backyard may actually be plants in danger of extinction. The Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is currently monitoring the new find and will be coordinating with the New York Natural Heritage Program to decide how best to protect this rare plant.- Andrew Boris

6/24 – Yonkers: Five more seine hauls in the Tappan Zee today at the Sarah Lawrence Center for the Urban River at Beczak as we looked for improving numbers of fish. We caught two bay anchovies (85 mm), hardly an encouraging sign of improved dissolved oxygen levels. Today’s measurement ws up a bit to 5.9 pp.

.Moon jellyfish
A Moon Jellyfish


The Invertebrates showed, however, including 28 sand shrimp, five each grass shrimp and blue crabs, three Leidy’s comb jellies, and one moon jellyfish. The river was 72.7 degrees F, and the salinity 11.8 ppt. – Jay Muller, Molly Galant, Aubrey Baker

Then our Fish of the Week:

6/19 – Fish-of-the-Week for Week 126 is the yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis), fish number 78 (of 234), on our Hudson River  Watershed List of Fishes. 

Yellow bullhead
A Yellow Bullhead

The yellow bullhead is one of eight North American catfishes (Ictaluridae) documented for the watershed, that includes the native white catfish and the introduced channel catfish. They are native to the Atlantic and Gulf coast watersheds from New York to northern Mexico, including the Great Lakes and Mississippi River where they can reach 15-inches. They favor ponds and clear streams and, while silty water is not conducive to their presence, they are occasionally found in the turbid waters of the Hudson River.

The original description of the yellow bullhead (Lesueur 1819) was as (Pimelodus natalis), with the type site listed simply as “Upper Canada” with no specific locality. Lesueur’s holotype (the original fish described) has been lost.

The yellow bullhead is one of my favorite fishes, primarily because of how seldom we see one. In the field, it is often tricky to distinguish a yellow bullhead from the far more common brown bullhead. One of the best field marks is their chin barbels: mottled white-yellow for the yellow bullhead; dusky brown or black for the brown bullhead. In many instances, the “yellow” of the yellow bullhead is instantly recognizable as it was a while ago during a seining program at Norrie Point when we caught a ten-inch yellow bullhead that was as yellow as a lemon drop. – Tom Lake

This 4th of July Week’s Bird is rightfully:


image of ...The American Eagles


Compost totals below have us feeling so, so green, 

UGS


Eco Fact of the Week:  Carbonneutral concrete by 2050 is the industry’s new goal…  (No way that’s soon enough!!)

Eco Tip of the Week:  Eyeglasses can be recycled for use by low income patients at the  Mount Sinai Eye & Ear Clinic, 310 East 14th Street!!  Place in a ziplock bag and drop off at the entry desk!!

2021 Compost Collected at 96th & Lex (from 4/2/2021): 6/4 – 6 bins, 160 Drop-Offs, 1122 lbs.; 6/11 – 6 bins, 200 Drop-Offs,1424 lbs.; 6/18 – 6 bins; 183 drop-offs, 1284 lbs.; 6/25 – 5 bins, 100 drop-offs, 1110 lbs.

2021 TOTALS – 4/2/2021-6/25/21: 58 bins; 1861 Drop-Offs; 12,582 lbs.

2020 TOTALS (1/9/20-3/25/20): 294 bins; 12,522 lbs. (6.5 tons)

2019 TOTALS: 43,417 lbs, (21.7 tons)

2018 TOTALS: 23,231 lbs. (11.65 tons)

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Happy July 4th and Long July 4th Weekend, UES!!

Fireworks!!   Tolerable weather and low-ish humidity!!  Lip-smacking, traditional July 4th American eats…  The lip-smacking best makings – from burgers to potato salad – all available at our UES Greenmarkets!!

But before we hit the 4th:

Today – July 2nd –  is Day #2 of Plastic Free July!!  So how ’bout getting onboard with the Plastic Pollution Quiz…  Then computing your plastic footprint with this Handy Plastic Calculator…  And wrap things up by partaking of Earth Day 2021’s great virtual Program!!

Two activist notes:

Should you think Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s could/should reduce the substantial plastic waste they produce

Informative to check out
 Sanitation’s map of the ever increasing number of Manhattan compost collection sites that’ve been restored…  Except you know where…

Not forgetting that UES June 20th paper shredding total:

We’re talking 7,360 pounds, you brilliant paper shredding maniacs!!

Returning to our markets:

Saturday, July 3rd:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

At their tables will be American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski Farms!!

Been putting garlic scapes – chopped fine – into everything…  Made egg salad with an entire dozen market eggs last week…  And the classic “Margaret Salad” (chopped radishes, zucchini, little-neck squash, cukes, tomatoes, scapes, s&p, oil and vinegar)…  Gobbled up Cherry Lane’s blueberries the minute we got home…

Yumm!!

Sunday, June 27th:  92nd Street Greenmarket
First Avenue at 92nd Street, 9am-3pm

With us will be American Pride Seafood, Sikking Flowers, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!  

Bring on Grandpa’s lettuce, that Phillips’ fruit, Halal’s sirloin and Mother Hubberts’ cheese!!  


And more events actual and live:

Saturday, July 10th:  High Bridge Walking Tour
Meet at the High Bridge, 2301 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan, 11am

Yet another great walking tour from NYC H2O…  This time, a foray round, about and on the High Bridge, NYC’s oldest standing bridge, engineering treasure dating from 1848 and once the vital link between the Croton Aqueduct and Bronx/Manhattan faucets!!  $30.  For more and to register

Sunday, July 11th:  Great Trees of Central Park Hike
Meet at West 100 Street and Central Park West, 2pm

Quoting our Urban Park Rangers: “Trees have a special place in our environment. Join us for a hike of Central Park in search of different species and learn some ways to identify these trees during the summer season.”  Free.  For required safety/health measures and more… 

Tuesday, July 20th to Sunday, June 25:  NY Classical Theater presents King Lear

Carl Schurz Park, East End Avenue at 87th Street, 7pm

And we quote:  “Adapted and directed by Stephen Burdman, the play will feature the optimistic interpretation of Nahum Tate’s 1681 adaptation, which was popular in England for over 150 years until Shakespeare’s original tragic text was restored in 1838,” writes Playbill. “In addition to the ending, several additional scenes from Tate’s version have been incorporated for this production. The Tate version has not been performed in New York City in over 30 years.”  Free but you must RSVP

Saturday, July  24th:   Marble Hill Walking Tour
Meet at Marble Hill, Broadway at 225th Street, 11am

NYC H2O strikes again with a tour that’ll answer the question…  “How did part of Manhattan become joined to the Bronx by moving a river?”  $30.  For the complete lowdown and tickets

Monday, July 26th:  No-Cost Screening Mammograms for Eligible Women 
Mobile Scan Van in front of AM Seawright’s office, 1485 York between 78th & 79th

Free and sponsored by Assembly Member Seawright!!  To determine your eligibility and make an appointment, just call 646-415-7932…

Saturday, July 31st:   All About Bats Walk

Meet at Central Park West & 81st Street, 7pm

Another great walk from our equally great Urban Park Rangers!!  Free.  For more and health safety measures required

Friday, August 27th, 5-7pm:  First UESide Plant Swap

67th Street Library Branch Garden , 328 East 67th Street, 5-7pm

Plans are afoot for the 67th Street and 53rd Street Libraries to team up for a first ever neighborhood Plant Swap!!  Both indoor and outdoor plants will be welcome.  Stay tuned for further details…

Events virtual:


Thursday, July 8th:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

Virtual doesn’t get more convivial than a knitters…  Chat…  Share your community interests…  Make new friends…  And, yes, knit!!  To RSVP… 



At your convenience:  Landscape Painting Tutorial with Eliana Perez, hosted by the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum  via Vimeo 

Quote, “Plein air painting was popular in the 19th century and would have been an activity enjoyed in the gardens of the Mount Vernon Hotel. In this video, artist Eliana Perez shares her inspiration, tools, and process for painting landscapes outside in a garden.”  Free.  Here’s the link…   And to view the Museum’s new virtual exhibition which includes Ms. Perez’s work


Of course, diverting diversions galore::

How wolves help drivers…  The wolf that discovered the Golden State…  NYC Landmarks strikes out again…  Ton of good will in last Sunday’s Metropolitan Diary…  Those Hudson River Almanac references to “seining”?  Here’s what it’s all about (scroll down to page 4)…  Naples and pizza Beavers of NYState  (scroll down to page 10)…  13 new NYC public art installations…  In praise of birdbaths (scroll down to page 14)…  The woman who saved American birds…  Return of the black-footed ferret maybe…

RSBlackFootedFerret_DeanBiggins_USGS_FPWC-hpr.jpg
A Black-Footed Ferret

Back to diversions:

What’s happening on our Esplanade of late…    Upcoming mega concert in Central Park…  NYS DEC Forest Ranger cave rescue training…  A UES restaurant named one of NYC’s best…  Greenmarket volunteer opportunities…  NYS Conservation Officers, deer jacking and fish out of season…  Watermelon, watermelon seeds and rind and health

Moving on to the Hudson River Almanac:

6/11 – Bronx:  For two years now, our Van Cortlandt Park Alliance team and I have found a few northern red-bellied cooters [turtles], including at least two females, around Van Cortlandt Lake. We have seen them moving across the park and have wondered if they were gravid females. Our staff research coordinator is interested in building a turtle monitoring program into our research studies in the park and these northern red-bellied cooters will fit very nicely. – John Butler, Program Director of Restoration and Stewardship

Northern red-bellied cooter
A Red-Bellied Cooter

[The northern red-bellied cooter (Pseudemys rubriventris), a large (12.6 pound) native basking turtle, has a complex existence. Their overall population is highly fragmented, and their numbers are diminishing. As a result, there are listed as a Federally Endangered Species. Their most well-known, albeit isolated, population is in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, 200 miles from the next closest population in New Jersey. Ironically, or perhaps sadly, the northern red-bellied cooter has also been a popular item of the pet trade. Sandy Chan, DEC Regional Habitat and Wildlife Manager for the Division of Fish and Wildlife, suggests that the northern red-bellied cooters in Van Cortlandt Park are a product of “pet dumping.” – Tom Lake]

6/11 – Manhattan:  On three occasions this week, Hudson River Park’s River Project staff checked the sampling and collection gear that we deploy off Pier 40 in Hudson River Park. Collectively, we captured a diverse group of impending-summer-time fish and crustaceans. Among the fishes were, two-each, lined sea horse (70 millimeter (mm)), northern pipefish (120-140 mm), tautog (85-440 mm) and, one each, white perch (220 mm) and oyster toadfish (240 mm). The nearly 18-inch tautog was stunning! Crustaceans included a feisty 20 mm carapace-width blue crab and a dashing little spider crab! Generally, all animals are returned to the river except on occasion when a particular fish or crustacean will be transferred to an aquarium in our student’s Wet Lab for education. – Siddhartha Hayes, Tina Walsh, Anna Koskol, Olivia Radick

Then there’s the pretty darned interesting Fish of the Week:

6/12 – Fish-of-the-Week for Week 125 is the kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka), fish number 94 (of 234), on our Hudson River Watershed List of Fishes. 

Kokanee
A Kokanee

[Kokanee is one of ten trout and salmon (Salmonidae) documented for our watershed. Six are native including lake trout, brook trout, and Atlantic salmon. Others were introduced primarily for sportfishing, such as chinook salmon, kokanee, rainbow trout, and brown trout. The presence of kokanee in Hudson River tidewater is likely the result of stockings in the upland watershed and subsequent escapes.

The typical site for kokanee is the ocean waters adjacent to the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia (Walbaum 1792). Like the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), the kokanee comes in two forms of the same species, Oncorhynchus nerka. The landlocked form is the kokanee; the sea-run anadromous form is called sockeye. Kokanee can reach 15-inches; the sea-run form can grow to 33-inches. A divergence of the two forms from a parent population may have occurred at the end of the Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago, when sockeye in glacial lakes became isolated and cut off from ocean waters.

Oncorhynchus nerka is on our list of fishes due to four known records (year, length in inches):
1974 8.7 kokanee (?)
1986 13.7 sockeye (?)
1997 12.0 sockeye (see Hudson River Almanac, Vol. III:80)
2005 14.8 sockeye (see Hudson River Almanac (2005)

The 1997 fish, identified by New York State Ichthyologist Bob Daniels, was a foot-long male sockeye, the sea-run form. The 2005 fish, also a male sockeye, led Ichthyologist Bob Schmidt to comment, “In addition to wondering what a salmon is doing in the Hudson River, one has to wonder what a mature male was doing here in January.” Coincidently, all four were collected at the Danskammer Point Power Generating Facility in Orange County (river mile 66.5). – Tom Lake

Add this gorgeous Bird of the Week:

Red-eyed Vireo by Tim Zurowski, Shutterstock

The Red-Eyed Vireo

May this and every 4th be red, white, blue and green,  

UGS 

Eco Facts of the Week:  

  • Roughly 9 billion tons of plastic has been produced since 1950 — the weight of over a billion elephants or 50 million blue whales.
  • Only 9% of this plastic has been recycled, 12% has been burned and 79% has ended up in our environment.
  • The equivalent of a truckload of plastic enters the oceans every minute.
  • Up to 9 in 10 seabirds, 1 in 3 sea turtles and more than half of whale and dolphin populations have ingested plastic. Studies reveal that species of crustaceans at the deepest depths of the ocean have ingested plastic.
  • Microplastics are in our food, water, air and even our bodies. We each consume the weight of a credit card worth of plastic on average per week.

Eco Tip of the Week:  instead of placing your fruit and veggies in the plastic bags supplied at stores and markets, simply put them in your reusable grocery bag. This simple practice alone can save millions of plastic bags from reaching our oceans.

2021 Compost collected at 96th & Lex from 4/2/2021: 4/2 – 2 bins, 55 Drop-Offs, 615 lbs.; 4/9 – 2 bins, 93 Drop-Offs, 480 lbs.; 4/16 – 3 bins, 136 Drop-Offs, 621 lbs.; 4/23 – 3 bins, 100 Drop-Offs, 615 lbs.; 4/30 – 135 Drop-Offs, 908 lbs.; 5/7 – 5 bins, 160 Drop-Offs, 1031 lbs.; 5/14 – 5 bins, 140 Drop-Offs, 904 lbs.; 5/21 – 6 bins, 195 Drop-Offs, 1368 lbs.; 5/28 – 5 bins, 150 Drop-Offs, 1018 lbs.

2020 TOTALS (from 1/9/20-3/25/20): 294 bins; 12,522 lbs.

2019 TOTALS: 43,417 lbs. (21.7 tons)

2018 TOTALS: 23,231,231 lbs. (11.65 tons)

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Happy National Pollinator Week, UESiders!!

So how’s Manhattan celebrating?

Friday, Saturday, Sunday, June 25th, 26th & 27th:   The Madison Square Park BioBlitz
Meet at the Fountain, Madison Square Park, Fifth Avenue & Broadway at 23rd Street, 9am

And we quote:  “Join expert-led tours to search the park high and low for pollinators. Together, we will make observations of these species and their habitats using the free iNaturalist app.  Each finding will help protect the pollinators that keep Madison Square Park green.”  Free!!  To register… 

And because we want pollinators all over NYC to thrive:


Until Our Next Real, Soaking Rain:  All Over the UES
On Your Block, Across the Street, Out on the Aves, Any and Everywhere

Let’s be keeping our trees and plants – so essential to pollinator life – well watered and alive, people!!  And, yes, early mornings and evenings are the best times to be giving them a good drink!!

Meanwhile:

It’s also World Upcycling Day  Increasingly relevant given the  U.N. climate report leaked a few days ago…

On the Shred-A-Thon front:

We should have the final stats by next week, but more than 200 of you great Shredees showed up and – judging by the paper level in the truck – at least 5,000 lbs got pulverized!! 

Oh, and let us not forget: 

Today’s also National Take Your Cat to Work Day!!  (Good thing we’re still mostly working from home, yes?) 

As for the week ahead:

Friday, June 25th: Family Movie Night
Asphalt Green’s Litwin Field, 90th between York & East End, 8pm

Family fave Disney’s “Raya and the Last Dragon” on the big screen!!  Sponsored by CM Kallos!!  Free.  To sign up and learn the health-conscious preparations required to attend… 

Saturday, June 26th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

With us will be the great American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski Farms!!

Nothing more sublime than the year’s first taste of a real tomato!!  (Been partaking of one, sliced and plain a day since Saturday!!)  Add a bottle of pickled eggs…  Croissants…  Duck sausage…

Market happiness!! 

Sunday, June 27th:  92nd Street Greenmarket
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

This Sunday’s line-up will be American Pride Seafood, Sikking Flowers, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!  

No surprise…  It’s another year of gorgeous, local edibles at at 92nd Street!!

Great to have Manager Arlene back with us, too!!

Our personal last week 92nd Street faves:  Norwich Meadows tiny, crisp, pink-centered cukes…  Grandpa’s parsley and dill…  Ole Mother Hubbert’s (crazy) chocolate milk…  

Sunday, June 27th:  The Compost Carnival
Queensbridge Park – Vernon Avenue at 41st Avenue, Long Island City, 1-5pm

Join The Save Our Compost Coalition for a Compost Carnival celebration of community composting and recent Big Reuse and Lower East Side Ecology Center compost site victories (over NYParks) with live music, food, family fun and – you bet – a pop-up food scrap drop-off!!  Plus:  Early arrivals will be treated to a Big Reuse compost site tour!!   Totally free!!  Just sign up… 

As July quickly approaches:

Friday, July 2nd:  UES Historic Neighborhood Walking Tour
Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden, 421 East 62nd Street, 4pm

So, what was the UES and, more specifically, the low Sixties like once upon a time??   The folks of the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum know and want to share!!  Free to members.  Non-members $10.  For more and to register

Saturday, July 10th:  High Bridge Walking Tour
Meet at the High Bridge, 2301 Amsterdam Ave, Manhattan, 11am

Yet another great walking tour from NYC H2O…  This time, a foray round, about and on the High Bridge, NYC’s oldest standing bridge, engineering treasure dating from 1848 and once the vital link between the Croton Aqueduct and Bronx/Manhattan faucets!!  $30.  For more and to register

Saturday, July  24th:   Marble Hill Walking Tour
Meet at Marble Hill, Broadway at 225th Street, 11am

NYC H2O strikes again with a tour that’ll answer the question…  “How did part of Manhattan become joined to the Bronx by moving a river?”  $30.  For the complete lowdown and tickets

Monday, July 26th:  No-Cost Screening Mammograms for Eligible Women 
Mobile Scan Van in front of AM Seawright’s office, 1485 York between 78th & 79th

Free and sponsored by Assembly Member Seawright!!  To determine your eligibility and make an appointment, just call 646-415-7932.. 

Then there’s this August save-the-date:

Friday, August 27th, 5-7pm:  First UESide Plant Swap

67th Street Library Branch Garden , 328 East 67th Street, 5-7pm

Plans are afoot for the 67th Street and 53rd Street Libraries to team up for a first ever neighborhood Plant Swap!!  Both indoor and outdoor plants will be welcome.  Stay tuned for further details…

Add some great virtual events:

At Your Convenience:  Make Music NY  

You missed last Monday’s great Esplanade Friends’ concert on our Esplanade??!!  Not to worry…  Here’s a sampling via Facebook!!

Monday, June 28th to Friday, July 2nd:  Virtual History Week from the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum

Experience 19th-century life for one week…  With each day focusing on a different theme such art, music, science, cooking or theater!!  Add to that virtual tours of the Museum and 19th-century games!!  $100 for your entire family’s participation!!  For full details and to register

Thursday, July 1st, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

Meet a bunch of wonderful neighbors who share your community interest and – you bet – your knitting passion…  To RSVP… 

Friday, July 2nd, 12:30pm: Virtual Lunchtime Lecture – Summer Drinks in the 19th Century on Zoom

The Mount Vernon Museum’s consulted a ton of sources to learn how 1800’s folks kept their cool!!  Free.  To register

Moving on to the realm of diverting diversions:

A NYS DEC-recommended guide to pollinator-friendly planting… How the UES voted (so far)…  A humble English gardener and media sensation…  Avoiding ticks in a ticky year…  Scholarships from the U.S. Composting Council (why not?!)…  Ten of NYC’s smallest parks…  Outdoor adventures for kids…  Development woes on at 86th and First…  Rescue training and actual rescues for our NYS Forest Rangers…  Balloon litter statewide…  “Finding the Mother Tree”…  The Subway tuna sandwich…  Women saving storks… Another Lady Liberty coming to our shores…  Possible climate change consensus…  ANYC approaches commercial waste zones…  The world sand shortage (sand gobbled up for making concrete) and Long Island water…  The NYC Strategic Nature Trails Plan…  $80M coming the our Esplanade…  What’s in bloom in Schurz Park

Moving on to the Hudson River Almanac:

6/6 – Hudson River Estuary: Today was the last day of sampling at the last net still fishing from the 2021 Hudson River Eel Project. Students and volunteers sampled at 12 sites from Staten Island to Troy (160 river miles) to monitor the numbers of glass eels arriving from the ocean to better understand this important species in decline.

Glass eel fyke net
Still Net Fishing on the Hudson

A total of 77,350 eels were caught, counted, measured, documented, and released upstream this year. In the 14 years of this community science monitoring program, volunteers have counted 1,382,926 glass eels. These numbers have allowed fishery managers to establish significant baseline data for the American eel.

As for the Fish of the Week:

6/6 – Fish-of-the-Week for Week 124 is the pollock (Pollachius virens), fish number 106 (of 234), on our Hudson River Watershed List of Fishes.

Pollock
A Pollock

Pollock is one of four cods (Gadidae) documented for our watershed; others include the Atlantic cod, Atlantic tomcod, and the ephemeral fourbeard rockling. All are strictly marine species except for the anadromous Atlantic tomcod. Making our Hudson River Watershed Fish List can be a serendipitous proposition. Pollock is on our list by virtue of a single occurrence, a 53 mm-long young-of-year from April 1980, at Indian Point (river mile 42).

Pollock, known colloquially as Boston blue, harbor pollock, and saithe (Norwegian spelling; favored in UK), are found in the western Atlantic primarily from Nova Scotia to Cape Cod. While immatures are common in the New York Bight (Waldman & Briggs 2002), adults are rare south of Cape Cod. Pollock feed on small fish and larger crustaceans along coastal slopes that favor a hard bottom. They spawn in late autumn early winter. Large pollock can reach 44-inches and weigh 70 pounds.

Bigelow & Schroder (1953) report that schools of young pollock run up New England estuaries in autumn in pursuit of rainbow smelt. There was a time when the Hudson River had a large population of anadromous rainbow smelt. Before serious fish lists were compiled, did pollock chase smelt up our estuary? Today, in a changing ocean environment, both smelt and pollock do not find the warm temperate waters of the New York Bight comfortable. The pollock may never have been here, and the smelt are all but gone. – Tom Lake

And This Week’s Bird:

image of ...

                                                                            The Waved Albatross

Dreaming of endless, green and well-watered tree beds,

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week:  The year 2020 was more than 1.2C hotter than the average year in the 20th Century!!  (Yes, we’ve noticed!!)

Eco Tip of the Week:  As of last week, Whole Foods at Union Square informs us they’ll  no longer be recycling corks!!  (Stay tuned…  We’ll find an alternative!!)

2021 Compost collected at 96th & Lex from 4/2/2021: 4/2 – 2 bins, 55 Drop-Offs, 615 lbs.; 4/9 – 2 bins, 93 Drop-Offs, 480 lbs.; 4/16 – 3 bins, 136 Drop-Offs, 621 lbs.; 4/23 – 3 bins, 100 Drop-Offs, 615 lbs.; 4/30 – 135 Drop-Offs, 908 lbs.; 5/7 – 5 bins, 160 Drop-Offs, 1031 lbs.; 5/14 – 5 bins, 140 Drop-Offs, 904 lbs.; 5/21 – 6 bins, 195 Drop-Offs, 1368 lbs.; 5/28 – 5 bins, 150 Drop-Offs, 1018 lbs.

2020 TOTALS (from 1/9/20-3/25/20): 294 bins; 12,522 lbs.

2019 TOTALS: 43,417 lbs. (21.7 tons)

2018 TOTALS: 23,231,231 lbs. (11.65 tons)

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Happy Father’s Day, All You NYC Dads!!

And we on the UESide will be celebrating this Dad’s Day as a 3-Day Weekend and in the greenest possible way with 4 fabulous, ultra-green events:

Event #1:  

Saturday, June 19th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

At their tables will be our friends American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski Farms!!

Maestra Manager Margaret’s adds this lovely news:

Dear Greenmarketeers:

As of this week and in accordance with CDC and NYS regulations, GrowNYC will be relaxing all our Greenmarket Covid restrictions!!

Which is to say, beginning this Saturday, we’ll no longer be enforcing social distancing and shoppers will once again be able to touch produce!!

Yes, masks are no longer required for fully vaccinated shoppers and staff… 

BUT… 

Of course, they’ll still be required for those who aren’t yet vaccinated.

We’re very much trusting that if you haven’t yet gotten your vax,  you’ll be both respectful of and patient with your neighbors and their health concerns and mask up!!  (And we’ll have masks available!!)

Oh, and likely you’ll be seeing some changes in market set-ups as we continue to adapt to post Covid life…

With this comes thanks to all who have patiently supported our farms and markets through out the last difficult year.
 
Looking forward to seeing you Saturday and Sunday this week,
 

Margaret


Event #2:

Sunday, June 20th:  92nd Street Greenmarket Reopens!!
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

Returning for another great market season will be our friends at Sikking Flowers, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms!!   WOW!!  Can’t wait to cruise all those tables heaped with primo edibles!!

Yup, you read that list right… No American Pride Seafood this Sunday… But they’ll be with us next week and every Sunday thereafter!!

Add to the joyful mix the Jazz Foundation and its great music!!

Bring those eyes, ears. large reusable shopping bags and be masked!!

Event #3:
 

Sunday, June 20th, 10am-2pm:  Shred-A-Thon – So Glad You’re Back Edition
Opposite the 92nd Street Greenmarket, West Side of First between 92nd & 93rd, 10am-2pm

Bring on that paper, UESiders!!  

And bring it on wearing your mask and socially distancing!!

AND, as always, keep in mind:

NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings.

NO hardcover books.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

As ever, we thank Shred-A-Thon sponsors AM Seawright and CMs Kallos and Powers for their generous support!!

Event #4:

Monday, June 21st:  Make Music New York at the Aycock Pavilion

The Alice Aycock Pavilion,  East River Esplanade at 60th Street, 3-7:30pm

Live music!!  Fun activities for all ages!!  Great refreshments!!  All free and with that wonderful river view!!  It’s Esplanade Friends opening summer season event and sponsored by the great Schulte Roth & Zabel and NYC Ferry!!

Make Music New York

Then 4 days later:

Friday, June 25th: Family Movie Night

Asphalt Green’s Litwin Field, 90th between York & East End, 8pm

Family fave Disney’s “Raya and the Last Dragon” on the big screen!!  Sponsored by CM Kallos!!  Free.  To sign up and learn the health-conscious preparations required to attend 

And then:

Sunday, June 27th:  A Community Walk at Ridgewood Reservoir

At the Ridgewood Reservoir, 58-2 Vermont Place, Queens, 1-3pm

Organized by the great NYC H20 and led by Assistant Director Join David Chuchuca and local community garden organizers, it’s our chance to explore this incredible natural resource right in the heart of NYC!!  Sponsored by CMs Holden, Reynosa and Diaz.  Free.   For more, directions and to sign up… 

Just over the horizon:

Monday, July 26th: No-Cost Screening Mammograms for Eligible Women 

Mobile Scan Van in front of AM Seawright’s office, 1485 York between 78th & 79th

Free and sponsored by Assembly Member Seawright!!  To determine your eligibility and make an appointment, just call 646-415-7932…  

Add some great virtual events:

Thursday, June 24th, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom 

Meet a bunch of wonderful neighbors who share your community interest and – you bet – your knitting passion…  Gentlemen welcome, too!! To RSVP… 

Monday, June 28th to Friday, July 2nd:  Virtual History Week from the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum

Experience 19th-century life for one week…  With each day focusing on a different theme such art, music, science, cooking or theater!!  Add to that virtual tours of the Museum and 19th-century games!!  $100 for your entire family’s participation!!  For full details and to register

Add a dollop of activism:

You might want to encourage Congresswoman Maloney to support the  Monarch Action, Recovery, and Conservation of Habitat (MONARCH) Act which would authorize funding for projects aiding recovery of. monarch populations in the western U.S…

And this great news re activism past: 

All those emails you sent to assure Lower East Side Ecology’s Compost Yard would be restored to the East River Park when construction is complete??  VICTORY!!

Moving on to the realm of diverting diversions: 

Bezos’s British fusion plant (holy crow!!)… The lowdown on (yummy) radicchio…  Oak trees and extinction…  Furry acts of kindness…  Contrary to last Sunday’s Times anti zoo screed (and/or watch any NatGeo zoo doc)…  West Virginia’s water…  “Elle Decor” in our hood…  Wind power, the world and the U.S…    Wind power and NYS…   The National Zoo’s baby panda cam

                                                                              That Baby Panda

Continuing on down the diversion trail:

Summer cooling recommended by the NYTimes…  The many, simple ways we can be outdoors city scientists…  Native NYC plants best for our birds and insects (scroll to page 10)…   great Brooklyn campsite...  Birdy books for kids (scoll to page 17)…   Adventures of a duck and her ducklings in Brooklyn…  Big bucks at play in our District 5 Council race…    Crayfish plus anti-depressants…  Plenty happening on Randall’s Island (like Pollinator Day!)…

Moving on to the Hudson River Almanac:

6/1 – Brooklyn: I pulled up one of our East River Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy oyster research cages hanging off our Pier 5 Marina this morning and found several amazing creatures residing with the oysters. They blended in very well at first, but we eventually caught site of a small, lined seahorse (50 millimeters (mm)) as well as a slightly larger northern pipefish. Those, however, were not the most exciting find; attached to a shell was a rather plump-looking sea anemone. It did not look much like other anemone species we have seen in this area. With some help from the science community, it was finally identified as Paranthus rapiformis, the onion anemone! – Christina Tobitsch

Onion anemone
That Onion Anemone

(The onion anemone, also known as the sea onion (Paranthus rapiformis) is from Actinostolidae, a family of sea anemones. They are a burrowing anemone inhabiting the lower reaches of rivers and bays, such as the East River. They can attach to the bottom muds in tidal flats by an expanded basal disk, often over pebbles and shells. Gosner (1978) describes their movements as “gliding about freely on their pedal disks.” Lippson and Lippson (1984) adds “When their tentacles are withdrawn, they look more like a garlic clove, than an onion.” – Tom Lake]

With the Fish of the Week being:

5/30 – Fish-of-the-Week for Week 123 is the conger eel (Conger oceanicus), fish number 22 (of 234), on our Hudson River Watershed List of Fishes.

Conger eel
A Conger Eel

Because eels can trace their ancestry back hundreds of millennia, the resulting myriad of specialized adaptations makes their relationships not well understood. C. Lavett Smith suggests that “… the present arrangement of 600 species must be considered tentative.” The conger eel (Congridae) is one of the largest families with 38 genera and 100 strictly marine species, and the only member of the family in our watershed. They are considered a temperature marine stray; when it is found in the lower estuary or New York Harbor, it can easily be mistaken for an American eel. In the field, we have to note the origin of their dorsal fin relative to the placement of other fins to tell them apart.

Conger eels can reach more than seven feet in length and weigh up to 88 pounds. They feed on fish, shrimp, and small mollusks. Conger eels range from Nova Scotia to the Gulf of Mexico. Locally, they spawn offshore of New England in deep water. Like American and European eels (Anguillidae), conger eels spawn once and then die. – Tom Lake

And This Week’s Wonderful Bird:

Do check out the surging compost numbers below!!

Yours in paper shredding greenness,

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week:  There are some 250 species of bumble bees worldwide!!

Eco Tip of the Week:  Recycle unwanted thermometers – carefully packed in bubble wrap  – by mailing them to  to Coastal Plumbing Supply, 38-16 Stillman Avenue, Long Island City, New York 11101.

2021 Compost collected at 96th & Lex from 4/2/2021): 4/2 – 2 bins, 55 Drop-Offs, 615 lbs.; 4/9- 2 bins; 93 Drop-Offs, 480 lbs.; 4/16 – 3 bins, 136 Drop-Offs, 621 lbs.; 4/23 – 3 bins, 100 Drop-Offs; 615 lbs.; 4/30 – 135 Drop-Offs, 908 lbs.; 5/7 – 5 bins, 160 Drop-Offs, 1,031 lbs.; 5/14 – 5 bins, 140 Drop-Offs, 904 lbs.; 5/21 – 6 bins, 195 Drop-Offs, 1368 lbs.; 5/28 – 5 bins, 150 Drop-Offs, 1018 lbs.

2020 TOTALS (from 1/9/20-3/25/20): 294 bins; 12,522 lbs.

2019 TOTALS: 43,417 lbs. (21.7 Tons)

2018 TOTALS: 23,231 lbs. (11.65 Tons)

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Happy Non-90 Degree/Non Massively Humid Weather, UESiders!!

We so deserve a run of pleasant market shopping/gardening/out-in- our-Parks and on-our-Esplanade/just-lazing-around days!!


AND there’s still more joy:

*Happy Reopening of the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House Senior Center on Monday, June 14th!!  (For complete details and how to order meals...)

*And how ’bout the happy new $80M coming to renovate our Esplanade 80th to 90th Streets??!!  (Let’s hope NYC/Parks gets to work on it in our lifetimes and with  world-class engineering/design!!)

Returning to the subject of our market (soon to be markets):

Saturday, June 12th:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

With us will be American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd,  Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski Farms!!

Ever more late spring/early summer produce!!  Fantastic flowers!!  Wonderful chicken, duck, beef and pork!!  Best milk, yoghurt, butter, eggs and cheese!!  Delicious breads and pastries!!  Carefully masked and socially distanced shoppers!!

Even when folks could/should avoid parking along the Market’s western boundary…  The 82nd Street  Greenmarket rules!!


Also on this weekend’s/coming week’s actual event agenda:

Saturday, June 12th:  No-Cost Paper Shred-a-Thon on Roosevelt Island Day!!
Motorgate Turnaround, 688 Main Street, Roosevelt Island, 10am-3pm

So great RIslanders no longer have to lug giant bags of paper in need of shredding over to UESide events (although they’ll always be welcome)!!  And no better way to celebrate the ever more green Roosevelt Island Day!!  Sponsored by AM Seawright and NY Sanitation. 

Meanwhile, there’re plenty more great RI Day festivities:




And there’s even more UES enjoyment:

Saturday & Sunday, June 12th & 13th:  Art & Music on the Upper East Side  

James Cagney Place, 91st Street between Second & Third, 12-6pm

Art that ranges from photographs of city buildings and parks to abstract and realist paintings…  Ceramics…  Textiles…  Delightful kid art…   Music, too, including a performance by students from Talent Unlimited High School!!  Organized by City Canvas, a new initiative by Community Board 8’s Arts Committee that aims to support local artists, actors and musicians!!  For more
.

And we’re now in the countdown phase for a big upcoming Sunday:

Sunday, June 20th:  92nd Street Greenmarket Reopens!!
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

Returning for another great market season will be our friends at American Pride Seafood, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms and Sikking Flowers!!   (WOW!!  And maybe more!!)

Plus… The Jazz Foundation will be with us making Opening Day 2021 a musical event, too!!

Needless to say, do mask up!!
 

Sunday, June 20th, 10am-2pm:  Shred-A-Thon – So Glad You’re Back Edition
Opposite the 92nd Street Greenmarket, West Side of First between 92nd & 93rd, 10am-2pm


Bring on that paper, UESiders!!  

And bring it on wearing  your mask and socially distancing!!

AND, as always, keep in mind:


NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings.

NO hardcover books.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

Monday, June 21st:  Make Music New York at the Aycock Pavilion
The Alice Aycock Pavilion,  East River Esplanade at 60th Street, 3-7:30pm

Live music!!  Fun activities for all ages!!  Great refreshments!!  All free and with a wonderful river view!!  It’s Esplanade Friends opening summer event and sponsored by the great Schulte Roth & Zabel and NYC Ferry!!

                         May be an image of text that says 'MONDAY 3pm 7:30pm JUNE 21, 2021 Performance Times: 3:00pm Liz Hogg Guitarist & Composer 5:00pm The Tomtown Ramblers bluegrass collective 6:30pm Sound Bridges Percussive Dance blend of West African Music jazz and tap dance MAKE MUSIC NEW YORK at the ALICE AYCOCK PAVILION Sound provided by FullStack Productions NY FREE! MUSIC, ACTIVITIES, AND REFRESHMENTS! SPONSORED BY Schulte Roth Zabel NYC 60th Street & Ferry The East River Waterfront Esplanade EsplanadeFriends.org EastRiverEsplanade@gmail.com /EsplanadeFriends @EsplanadeFriend cran studio'

Thursday, June 24th:  UES Blood Donation Event
The Church of Heavenly Rest, 1085 Fifth Avenue at 90th Street, 10am-4pm


No mystery NYC continues to suffer from a concerning blood shortage so, a la Covid vaccination, great for northern UESiders to be able to donate close to home!!  Sponsored by CM Powers.  To make your appointment

Friday, June 25th: Family Movie Night
Asphalt Green’s Litwin Field, 90th between York & East End, 8pm

Family fave Disney’s “Raya and the Last Dragon” on the big screen!!  Sponsored by CM Kallos!!  Free.  To sign up and learn the health-conscious preparations required to attend… 

Sunday, June 27th:  A Community Walk at Ridgewood Reservoir

At the Ridgewood Reservoir, 58-2 Vermont Place, Queens, 1-3pm

Organized by the great NYC H20 and led by Assistant Director Join David Chuchuca and local community garden organizers, it’s our chance to explore this incredible natural resource right in the heart of NYC!!  Sponsored by CMs Holden, Reynosa and Diaz.  Free.   For more, directions and to sign up

Then there’re events virtual:


Tuesday, June 15th:  The Potential of the Public Realm.  

Join Council Member Keith Powers and the Municipal Art Society’s Livable Neighborhoods Program for a presentation and discussion re two community proposals to expand and better manage open space for a more livable, equitable city.  Free.  For more and to register

Thursday, June 17th, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social on Zoom

Meet a bunch of wonderful neighbors who share your community interest and – you bet – your knitting passion…  To join zoom …  (Meeting ID: 822 8581 8280, passcode “knit”) 

Monday, June 28th to Friday, July 2nd:   Virtual History Week from the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum

Experience 19th-century life for one week…  With each day focusing on a different theme such art, music, science, cooking or theater!!  Add to that virtual tours of the Museum and 19th-century games!!  $100 for your entire family’s participation!!  For full details and to register… 


Then in the activist mode: 

Deepest respect for Warriors in the Park’s defense of the threatened East River Park…  For details…  And should you wish to sign on to the Warriors’ petition… 
 
Ever more diverting diversions:

The regenerative agriculture movement expands…  Product labels  that enhance recyclability…  Lithium ion battery production and recycling advances…  Low carbon aluminum production…  Environmental tragedy in the Sea of Marmara…  Great tiny homes circa 1947…  Then there’s the 1947 Canadian Small House Competition…  What our NYS Forest Rangers have been up to of late…  Carl Schurz Park in bloom…   More UES demolition…  Underwater with the Billion Oyster Program…  Colorado’s great and stern new plastic bag law…  A Venezuelan bird rediscovered…  Roosevelt Island’s first hotel…  The Natural History Museum’s new Hall of Gems…  Vehicle charging in the U.K…  A centuries old candle…  Reusable Starbuck’s cups in Europe and around the world…  A guinea pig doc…  Dove Soap (!) doing good…   NYC’s custard history…  Once and present Madison Square Gardens… Police departments going EV



Moving on to Hudson River Almanac:

5/15 – Manhattan: Hudson River Park’s River Project staff checked the sampling and collection gear toady that we deploy off Pier 40 in Hudson River Park. We found that we had caught a crafty lined seahorse that had its prehensile tail wrapped around the mesh of our crab pot. However, the seahorse disengaged as the pot cleared the water and it fell back before we could measure it. Other featured animals included a feisty blue crab (115 mm), a white perch (185 mm), and a stunning tautog (270 mm). – Siddhartha Hayes, Olivia Radick

5/21 – Manhattan: Our Environmental Programs umbrella of RIPA (Natural Areas, Urban Farm, and Public Programming departments) finally got the opportunity to go seining today. Our Randall’s Island Park Alliance Staff began at the Water’s Edge Garden along the Harlem River where the water was 72 degrees F, and the salinity was 21.0 ppt. We made three hauls of our net going against the current and caught eleven Atlantic tomcod (46-60 mm), seven winter flounder (30-45 mm), six bay anchovies (75 mm), a spotted hake (102 mm), and three northern pipefish (170-185 mm). The male pipefish all had prominent brood pouches although the eggs had not yet matured and developed their orange color.


                                                 Sand shrimp
                                                        A Pregnant Male Pipefish

The incredible abundance of river life also included comb jellies, two lion’s mane jellyfish, 131 mud dog whelk snails (their eggs were present on algae), twelve blue crabs (15-60 mm), 26 grass shrimp, and 189 sand shrimp (many with eggs). Sand shrimp (Crangon septemspinosa) consistently outnumbered grass shrimp (Palaemonetes sp.) throughout the day.

Later in the day at the Little Hell Gate Salt Marsh on the East River, the water was also 72 degrees F, and the salinity was 23.0 ppt. From several seine hauls there, our catch included 433 mummichogs (45-100 mm), a gorgeous little white mullet (45 mm), and two Atlantic silverside. Many of the male mummichogs were in their breeding colors while some of the females were very rotund with eggs. – Jackie Wu, Jhanelle Mullings


Love this Fish of the Week:

5/17 –  Fish-of-the-Week for Week 121 is the slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), fish number 136 (of 234), on our Hudson River  Watershed List of Fishes.


                                                      Slimy sculpin
                                                                   A Slimy Sculpin

The slimy sculpin is one of four members of the sculpin family (Cottidae) documented for our watershed. Of the four, however, the slimy sculpin is the only freshwater species; the other three are found in marine waters. The slimy sculpin ranges from northeastern Siberia, across Canada, and then south along the Atlantic coast to Virginia. Adults can grow to 120 mm.

The slimy sculpin is considered a periglacial species, one that was among the first of the fishes to arrive in our watershed following the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet about 15,000 years ago. Other periglacial fishes include lake trout, northern pike, and our New York State fish, the brook trout.

In September 1994, C. Lavett Smith, Curator of Fishes at the American Museum, and I conducted a Town of Olive Fish Survey (Ulster County) for the Town of Olive Natural Heritage Society. As part of the survey, we sampled lower Bushkill Creek at its confluence with South Hollow Brook, both Esopus Creek tributaries. Much like the margined madtom (last week’s Fish-of-the-Week) slimy sculpins prefer clear, cold water streams, living among rocky riffles.

They are primarily insectivores with mayflies contributing 35% of their diet. Therefore, it is not surprising to find them sharing habitats with trout. Using a small seine (10×5-feet), we collected four slimy sculpins (74-78-mm) along with three brown trout (Salmo trutta). – Tom Lake


And the wonderful Bird of the Week: 

image of ...                                                                The Black Skimmer Scissor-Bill

June 16th is World Refillable Day…  As in green people such as ourselves using refillable water bottles!!  

Next up…  Plastics-Free July, 

UGS



Eco Fact of the Week:  The average American throws away 81 pounds of clothing per year.
95% or worn or torn textiles can be recycled.  However, only 15% gets donated or recycled.


Eco Tip of the Week:  Ladies, you can recycle your gently worn bras either by mailing yourself to The Bra Recycler, 4904 South Power Road, Suite 103-441, Mesa, AZ 85212 or go to https://www.brarecycling.com for a free mailing label. 

 

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Happy World Environment Day, World Ocean Day, Invasive Species Awareness Week and Official National Hug Your Cat Day, UESiders!!

And welcome to another wild and wooly weather weekend!! 

Underscoring that description, as we write, hail-mixed rain’s pelting  UES  windows while thunder rolls!!

Yikes…


(Although does make one feel a tiny bit better about upcoming 90 degree days!!)But there’s plenty useful, fun and uplifting  to do while we huddle near air conditioners:

View at your convenience: The Manhattan Borough President (Democrat) Candidate Debate on NY1.  Just click here

Read any old time: “The Disease Detective” from the NYTimes  News of some of the many fabulous folks working for global good!!  Yours at…  (Thanks for the tip, reader Susan Blackwell!)

From the Knowledge is Power File and any time you want: Internal Docs Reval 60% of Nestle (World’s #1 food company) products are unhealthy!!. Got to read it…  

So what if it’s “warm” outside when our market’s happening: 

Saturday, May 22nd:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

Everybody’ll be at those tables…  American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski  Farms!!

Magna Suprema Plus Market Manager Margaret shares what’s up this week:

Dear Greenmarketeers, 

Each and every June weekbrings more new and exciting produce to  82nd Street tables!!

Strawberries…  Asparagus…  Rhubarb…  Spinach…  Heads of many  kinds of lettuce…  Sugar snap peas, too!!

While you’re loading up with all that fabulousness, just keep in mind:

Until we hear otherwise from NYS Department of Ag & Markets, GrowNYC recommends Greenmarket mask wearing and enforcement of social distancing at all markets.   In other words and as applies to you wonderful 82nd Street shoppers,  keep up your great work keeping things safe for others and yourselves!!
   
Then and as ever, there’s this request/plea regarding parking on the western half of East 82nd…  Please-please-please…  Help us keep it clear for farmers’ trucks and tables and your social distancing!!

Enjoy your shopping and great eating,

Margaret

There’s even more coming up that’s live and in person:

Monday, June 7th, 10-11:30am: Earth Day Esplanade Clean-Up
Hosted by Esplanade Friends and Green Park Gardeners.  Gloves, grabbers and trash bags supplied.  Meet at 12:30 at Esplanade’s 71st Street ramp.  Dress for cleaning!!  Be thoroughly sunscreened!! To join in ExecutiveDirector@esplanadefriends.org

Tuesday, June 8th, 10:30am-12:30pm: Tree Pruning on Randall’s Island.  Learn tree care from the master, TreesNY’s Sam Bishop (AKA “Mr. Trees”!).  You’ll thank yourself!!  Free, of course.  For more, where to meet and sign up… 

Thursday, June 10th, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social.  One sure path to neighborly acquaintances…   Knit…  Chat…  Share UES pluses/issues..  And knitting wisdom, of course..  To RSVP and join in

Saturday, June 12th:  No-Cost Paper Shred-a-thon at Roosevelt Island Day.  Sponsored by AM Seawright and NY Sanitation.  Details to coming soon…

Sunday, June 20th:  92nd Street Greenmarket Reopens!!
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

Returning for another great market season will be our friends at American Pride Seafood, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms and Sikking Flowers!!   (WOW!!  And maybe more!!)

Plus… The Jazz Foundation will be with us making Opening Day 2021 a musical event, too!!

Needless to say, let’s all remember to mask up!!
 

Sunday, June 20th, 10am-2pm:  Shred-A-Thon – So Glad You’re Back Edition
Opposite the 92nd Street Greenmarket, West Side of First between 92nd & 93rd, 10am-2pm

Bring on that paper, UESiders!!  

And bring it on wearing  your mask and socially distancing!!

AND, as always, keep in mind:

NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings.

NO hardcover books.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

Friday, June 25th, 8pm: Family Movie Night on the Asphalt Green’s Litwin Field, 90th between York & East End.  This time it’s Disney’s “Raya and the Last Dragon: on the big screen!!  Sponsored by CM Kallos!!  Free.  To sign up and learn the health-conscious preparations to attend

Opening June 28th at the American Folk Museum:  American Weathervanes Exhibition.  Gonna be amazing!! Free.  For brief look, more info and timed tickets

Some great virtual events, too:

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2-4pm: EPA Coastal Climate Change Webinar.   And we quote, “The challenges of climate change adaptation planning, including the methodologies and tools currently available and how they are being used to develop adaptation strategies… ”  Could it be more pertinent to NYC?  Free.  For more and to register

Muncipal Art Society’s June Tours:  Couldn’t Be More Diverse. Members $15.  Non-members $25. For more and to register… 

Add these diverting diversions:

Origins of the watermelon (revised)…  Puppies and their human connection…  New restaurants coming to the UES…  Another facet of India’s coal problem…  Actual, tangible, existing corporate removal CO2 policies…  Results from Cornell’s latest (bird) FeederWatch…  Consumer Reports’ deep discounted products for June…  A Pompidou Center in Jersey(!)…  Progress at the UES Trader Joe’s…  A shark activity pack for 4-8 year olds…   How to share summer beaches with birds…   A NYS 4-H summer camp…  Houseplants for fun and obsession

Latest from the Hudson River Almanac:

5/22– Brooklyn: The Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy welcomed visitors onto the Pier 4 beach to watch as we seined in the East River. After last summer’s COVID hiatus from public programs, children and adults alike were curious and excited to get a glimpse of the life lurking below the surface of the river. With the help of many young novice scientists, with dichotomous keys in hand, we identified and counted Atlantic tomcod, skilletfish (five), seaboard goby (2), northern pipefish (2), Atlantic silverside (2), and a beautiful winter flounder (160 millimeters (mm)). We also found plenty of our local intertidal zone favorites such as shore shrimp, sand shrimp, young-of-year blue crabs, and mud snails. – Christina Tobitsch

Mud snail | Backyard and Beyond
A Mud Snail

[This season seems to be favoring lined seahorses (Hippocampus erectus). We have been reading of the Hudson River Park’s River Project staff finding sea horses off Manhattan’s Pier 40. At the same time, we have captured three in our oyster research cages so far this spring. Christina Tobitsch]

A Lined Sea Horse

5/23 – Manhattan:  We had been fishing with cut bunker (Atlantic menhaden) for striped bass off Inwood Park’s Dykeman Pier, without any joy (catch), since 8:00 AM. This afternoon we moved up the pier on our way home to give the fish one more chance. Our persistence paid off when we hooked and landed a handsome fish that we had never seen before. Following a bit of research, we discovered that we had caught our first ever spotted hake (Urophycis regia). After taking a photo, the spotted hake was released safely back into the Harlem River. In the past, we’ve caught American eels, oyster toadfish, and striped bass from this pier. – Nicola Logonigro, Anthony Logonigro

Spotted hake
That Spotted Hake

[Two days previous to the Logonigro’s catch, a spotted hake was captured in a seine in the Harlem River at Randall’s Island, downstream of Inwood Park. – Tom Lake]

5/28 – Manhattan: Hudson River Park’s River Project staff checked the sampling and collection gear that we deploy off Pier 40 in Hudson River Park. Today our traps contained just one fish, but a good one: an oyster toadfish (210 mm). – Anna Koskol, Toland Kister

Oyster Toadfish (Fish of Coastal New Jersey) · iNaturalist
An Oyster Toadfish

Then there’s the Fish of the Week: 

5/27 – Hudson River Watershed: Fish-of-the-Week for Week 122 is the spotted hake (Urophycis regia), fish number 109 (of 234), on our Hudson River Watershed List of Fishes.

Spotted hake
Another Spotted Hake

Spotted hake (Urophycis regia) is one of eight cods (Gadidae) documented for our watershed; they include Atlantic cod, Atlantic tomcod, and pollock. All are marine species except for the anadromous Atlantic tomcod.

They are a colorful fish, brownish tinged with yellow, with dark spots and black-and-white “streaks” running from their head to their pectoral fins. A linear series of white spots also runs laterally along their side. They are found from Nova Scotia to Texas, can grow to 16-inches, spawn offshore and move inshore in winter for much of that range. They feed on fishes such as menhaden and other herring, as well as squid and various crustaceans. Spotted hake are a sometimes-catch by anglers in late winter in the lower estuary and around Manhattan. – Tom Lake

(Our great market fisherman, Warren, usually has hake!!)

And this week’s bird: 

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 Black-Throated Green Warbler

World Sustainable Gastronomy Day (June 18th) will be so green,

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week:  Digging in the dirt really does lift your spirits.  Digging stirs up microbes in the soil.  Inhaling these microbes can stimulate serotonin production, which can make you feel relaxed and happier!! 

Eco Tip of the Week:  Recycle those dead batteries (in already used ziplock bag) to Best Buy, Lex & 86th!! 

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Happy 3-Day/Memorial Day Weekend, UESiders!!

Who cares if it rains??!!  (We need those droplets!!)

We’re vaxed!!  (Right??!!)

We’ve got our market with ever more summer produce on its tables!!  (And we’re still wearing our masks as we shop!!)

Plus, it’s looking like Monday weather will be downright perfect!!


There’s still more good news and on the world stage, i.e.:

*Some 250 of us UESiders turned out for last Sunday’s rally opposing construction of the Blood Center proposed 330 foot tower!!

*Followed by Tuesday’s CB8 resolution opposing the project!!  Plus this second article on the subject

*As noted previously, if you or anyone you know has yet to weigh in on the very real question as the UES’s – if not all of NYC’s – zoning future:  To let CB8 know how you feel…  And also express your opinion via CM Kallos’s survey…   

*In the heat’s (literally )on department, the Dutch court’s just ruled that Europe’s largest oil company, Royal Dutch Shell, must/will be legally compelled to step up its efforts to reduce its CO2 emissions!!  (Thanks so much, Friends of the Earth,  for bringing the case!!) 


*Plus and thanks again green activists, Exxon will now be seating at least 2  environmentally inclined individuals on its board of directors!! 

*Chevvron’s feeling the heat, too, as Chevron shareholders backed a call for the company to cut emissions from the end-use of its fuels with 61 percent supporting the petition. Another resolution calling for a report on the business impact of achieving net zero emissions by 2050 was backed by 48 percent of votes cast!!

*Add to that, mayors of 3 climate change threatened cities – Miami-Dade County, Florida; Athens, Greece; and Freetown, Sierra Leone (thanks to funding from the Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation) have committed to appointing chief heat officers!! 

Then there’s our market:   

Saturday, May 22nd:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket

82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

The entire gang’s with us this holiday weekend…  American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers, Hudson Valley Duck and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott,  Cherry Lane, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski  Farms!!

Ultra Extrema Market Manager Margaret has the latest:

Dear Greenmarketeers, 

Strawberries!!  Asparagus!!  Rhubarb!!  Spinach!!  Peonies!!  All in season now and on our market tables this week!!

If you are planning a holiday barbecue be sure to check out Haywood’s Fresh for beef and pork from grass-fed animals!!   Delicious, nutritious and as humane as possible!!

If it’s a picnic you are planning, Hudson Valley Duck has several smoked or cured duck products that are  ready-to-eat and totally delicious paired with sheep, cow or goat cheese from Valley Shepherd Creamery!!

And what weekly update from me would be complete without a reminder that to keep all our farmers, friends and neighbors healthy. please-please be wearing your masks and looking for those tape and chalk marks to best keep that still essential social distance!!

Not forgetting those few parking spots west of the market either!!  Please-please-please help us out by parking east of the market!!

Enjoy this lovely, long weekend,


Margaret


Just 3 weeks away from more big market doings at 92nd Street:

Sunday, June 20th:  92nd Street Greenmarket Reopens!!
First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

Returning for another great market season will be our friends at American Pride Seafood, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery,  Norwich Meadows and Phillips Farms and Sikking Flowers!!   (WOW!!  And maybe more!!)

Plus… The Jazz Foundation will be with us making Opening Day 2021 a musical event, too!!

Needless to say, let’s all remember to mask up!!
 
And on that very same June 20th day:


Sunday, June 20th, 10am-2pm:  Shred-A-Thon – So Glad You’re Back Edition
Opposite the 92nd Street Greenmarket, West Side of First Avenue between 92nd & 93rd, 10am-2pm


Bring that paper on, UESiders!!  

And bring it on wearing  your mask and socially distancing!!

And, as always, keep in mind:


NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings.

NO HARDCOVER BOOKS.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

A bit of activism:

If you think NYState’s wetlands require greater protection, send NYS Senate Majority Leader Steward Cousins an email saying just this:  “Please bring  S5116C to the floor for a vote.” to  scousins@nysenate.gov!!

So what would a week be without some new outrage?  This one being a NYC-and-environs-bigtime-embarrassment:  The uncertain future of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney’s – she of the Whitney Museum –  Greenwich Village and Long Island studios…  Yikes!!


Live, in-person, participatory events:

Memorial Day Weekend, May 29th – July 1st:  Randall’s Island Summer Season Kick-Off.  Stroll…  Loll (gently) on the grass…  Take in the gorgeous gardens and art installation…  Barbecue (safely, cleanly) up a delicious storm…  All for free!!  Randall’s Island’s becoming one amazing  destination!!  For more…  

Saturday, May 29th, 10am-12;30pm:  Lemon Creek Beach Clean-Up.  Hosted by the great NYC H2O, National Resources Protective Association, the American Association of Zookeepers at the Staten Island Zoo and Engines for Change.  Lend a hand to get one of the last of NYC’s last ground-level creeks!!  All equipment provided.  For more and to register… 

Saturday, June 5th, 12-3pm:  Prince’s Bay & Lemon Creek Walking Tour.  Hosted by NYC H2O, sponsored by CM Borelli and led by artist, photographer, and journalist Nathan Kensinger.  Think landmarked houses, oyster middens, protected woodlands and NYC longest above-ground creek!!  Free.  For further details and reserve your place


Then there’s 100% virtual:

At Your Convenience:  City Council District 5 Candidates Forum with Roger Clark on chneighbors.org.  Okay, so there was a bit of tech implosion in transmitting this past Wednesday’s live event…  But now it’s up online and totally available…  Just go to chneighbors.org!!

Thursday, June 3rd, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social.  One sure path to neighborly acquaintances…   Knit…  Chat…  Share UES pluses/issues..  And knitting wisdom, of course..  All you need to do is join in on zoom!!

Thursday, June 10th, 5-7pm:  A Virtual Rat Academy.   Hosted by Council Speaker Johnson and led by the Academy’s most knowledgeable health officers!!  So useful in combatting city rodent life!!  To register…   

Monday, June 14th, 12-1pm:  2021 NYC Food Waste Fair – Food Waste Policy Action, Setting & Reaching National Targets on Food Waste.  Hosted by Sanitation Foundation, moderated by Emily Broad Leib , Clinical Professor of Law; Faculty Director of the Food Law and Policy Clinic, Harvard Law School with guests Dana Gunders, Executive Director, ReFED; Yvette Cabrera, Director, Food Waste, Natural Resources Defense Council; and Claudia Fabiano, Environmental Protection Specialist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  $10.  For more and tickets

Plenty of diverting diversions this time out:

Poaching and radioactive rhino horns  “The Great Electric Airplane Race” on PBS’s Nova (let’s cross our fingers!!)…  Landmarks lets yet another historic building fall…  Making models of ancient books…  Making great-looking felt flowers…  The NYC Marathon returns fall 2021…  A delicious Siberian dessert…   An argument for fixing USA infrastructure…  Best UES Taco spots… The DSNY sculpture honoring workers who died from Covid… Sonic Cloisters…  Has that sunscreen expired...  How to eat more fruits and vegs…  Outdoor theater coming to Roosevelt Island…  History of Cheez-Its…  Pompeii frescoes recovered…  The 20 companies producing 50% of single-use plastic…  Five facts about Carnegie Hall…  The secret life of poison ivy

This week’s Hudson River Almanac entry:

5/8 – Manhattan:  We had a bird walk at the Randall’s Island Park today for World Migratory Bird Day. We saw many barn swallows swooping over the Harlem River as well as our usual array of European starlings, American robins, Canada geese, and various sparrows. We ended the walk at our Little Hell Gate salt marsh where we were in for multiple treats: A great egret swooped in and a belted kingfisher followed soon after. Additionally, I had been watching a robin’s nest for 24 days and finally caught a glimpse of two little hatchlings. Others among the twenty bird species we counted were brant, green heron, hermit thrush, and Baltimore oriole. – Jackie Wu

5/10 – Hudson Valley: For those bald eagle nests that were successful this spring, many if not most are within a few to several weeks of a fledge for their nestlings. On average, a bald eagle nestling will fledge 72-90 days after a hatch. Nestlings are currently “branching,” an activity where the birds discover their wings by taking mini-flights and exploring within the nest tree.
 
NY 62 Bald Eagle Nestlings photo courtesy of Bob Rightmyer                                                          Eagle Mom and Nestling

Here are the predicted fledge dates for four Hudson Valley bald eagle nests (4 of 50 or more).  All have two nestlings:

NY62 Poughkeepsie June 2-20
NY142 Esopus June 1-19
NY459 Wappinger June 10-28
NY485 Waterford June 24-July 12                               – Tom Lake


Fish of the Week time:

5/12 – Hudson River Watershed: Fishes-of-the-Week for Week 120 is the margined madtom (Noturus insignis), fish number 83 (of 234), on our Hudson River Watershed List of Fishes. 


                                                   Margined madtom
                                             A Margined Madtom

The margined madtom is a slender, diminutive catfish, one of eight North American catfish (Ictaluridae) species documented for the Hudson River watershed. They occur in Atlantic slope drainages from the Saint Lawrence River and Lake Ontario to Georgia including the Hudson River watershed. Margined madtoms frequent clear-water streams, living among rocks in riffles and across gravelly substrate. Adults can grow to 150 millimeters(mm), (6-inches).

In September 1994, C. Lavett Smith, Curator of Fishes at the American Museum, and I conducted a Town of Olive Fish Survey (Ulster County) for the Town of Olive Natural Heritage Society. As part of the survey, we sampled lower Butternut Creek, a heavily forested tributary of Esopus Creek. The creek was narrow (only a meter-wide in places), shallow, and cold (59 degrees F). Using a “kick-net” (a broad-throated landing net) we caught a single margined madtom (85 mm), the only one we caught during the entire survey. These small catfish are very cryptic and difficult to collect given their rocky, crevasse-filled habitat.

It was during that encounter in the shadows of the forest, holding in my wet hand a rare catch—in my experience—that I was reminded to show caution with catfish. As with all catfish, this one had hardened pectoral and dorsal rays. Handling one safely means avoiding the sharp pointed rays. On this day, my attention was diverted by the moment and the madtom stuck me in my thumb. Painful, but not fatal. It was sore for a day or so and became a lesson learned. – Tom Lake


[Hardened dorsal and pectoral rays are a survival adaptation. Catfish can erect and lock them in a fully erect position, probably as a response to a threat. If a predator tries to swallow a catfish, the hardened rays get stuck in their mouth. While it is uncommon, it is not rare to find a striped bass washed up on a beach, having drowned with a catfish stuck in its throat.  – Tom Lake]

Love this Bird of the Week:


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                                                                        The Snowy Plover

It’s Garden for Wildlife Week,

UGS



Eco Fact of the Week:   According to recent figures from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the world currently has more trash than at any point in history with the U.S. generating nearly 300 million tons a year.

Eco Tip of the Week:  Remove tops from plastic containers and place separately in bin.  Reason why??  They could be different plastic grades!!

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Happy International Bee Day, UESiders!!

We all totally love bees, of course, but check out the up close, personal and barehanded love of Texas “bee remover”
 Erica Thompson… 

And how best should we more timid bee enthusiasts celebrate:

  1. Have a bee breakfast that incorporates honey
  2. Plant bee-friendly, nectar-bearing flowers in gardens, be those gardens on balconies. terraces or First Ave Islands
  3. Maybe even visit a beekeeper to become acquainted with his/her work

(World Turtle Day is Sunday, May 23rd!!)

Moving further into the good news groove:

The Natural Areas Conservancy and NYC Parks have joined in a 30-year plan to preserve NYC wetlands!!

On the flip side, there’s:

The debacle that’s East River Park

And the pair – as in a big fat two – charging stations to be installed on the UES…  

Back to the bright and sunny:

NYC’s newest park – Little Island – opened yesterday!!

NYC’s first all-electric street sweeper!!

The USDA’s just announced up to $2M in grants for local governments’ community composting programs!!

Best news always is our 82nd Street Market:

Saturday, May 22nd:  82nd Street/St. Stephen’s Greenmarket
82 Street between First & York Avenues, 9am-2pm

At their tables will be American Pride Seafood, Bread Alone, Ballard’s Honey, Sikking Flowers and Haywood’s Fresh, Samascott, Ole Mother Hubbert, Valley Shepherd, Hawthorne Valley and Gajeski Farms!!

Maxima Total Market Manager Margaret adds:

Dear Greenmarketeers,

So happy to say that Cherry Lane returns this Saturday!!  (And, yes, that rumor’s still alive…  That return could be accompanied with strawberries!!)

AND…

Whew!!  Hudson Valley Duck will be back with us, too!!  (Be sure to try their newest product:  Sous vide duck breast!!  It’s just great!!  (Fully cooked and well-seasoned, all you have to do is just crisp up the skin in a pan, then slice and serve.  It’s perfect over a salad of spring greens!!) 

Masks for all remains the rule and those chalk and tape marks to help with safe distancing remain in place!!

BUT…


Yikes!!  Parking was truly challenging last week with every single space taken up.  PLEASE look for space on another block…  Or, at least, the eastern end of 82nd!!   Farmers and shoppers will both so appreciate it!!

Know you’ll enjoy your shopping,

Margaret

May be an image of flower and nature
Himalayan blue poppies in the rain, Valley of Flowers National Park, Uttarakhand, India

Add these to your live-and-in-person UES events:

Saturday, May  22nd, 10am-12pm: 
 It’s My Park Volunteer Project at  Day at Thomas Jefferson Park.  The great Green and Blue Eco Care’s at it again…  This time spring cleaning-up/warm weather readiness at this wonderful Upper/Upper East Side park!!  All park tidying equipment provided.  Just sign up (a must: simonespalace@gmail.com )…    And bring your well-masked self to the park entrance nearest 114th Street and Mount Pleasant Ave… 

Sunday, May 23rd, 2pm:  Rally to STOP the Tower on the Julia Richman Education Complex Steps, 317 East 67th Street.  Think years of street-clogging construction resulting in a 334 foot commercial tower that shades St. Catherine’s Park and the Julia RIchman Complex the greater part of the any day is a pretty poor idea??  Then see you at this Sunday’s rally!!  (Headcount’s essential, folks!!) 

Saturday, May 29th, 10am-12;30pm:  Lemon Creek Beach Clean-Up.  Hosted by the great NYC H2O, National Resources Protective Association, the American Association of Zookeepers at the Staten Island Zoo and Engines for Change.  Lend a hand to get one of the last of NYC’s last ground-level creeks!!  All equipment provided.  For more and to register… 

Saturday, June 5th, 12-3pm:  Prince’s Bay & Lemon Creek Walking Tour.  Hosted by NYC H2O, sponsored by CM Borelli and led by artist, photographer, and journalist Nathan Kensinger.  Think landmarked houses, oyster middens, protected woodlands and NYC longest above-ground creek!!  Free.  For further details and reserve your place

Moving on to the purely virtual:

Tuesday, May 25th, 4pm: City Council District 5 Candidates Forum on chneighbors.org. Hosted by Carnegie Hill Neighbors, Health Advocates, Civitas, the 86th Street Association, Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts and NY1’s Roger Clark. Council candidates weigh on District 5 issues ranging from the economic to just plain but all-important quality of UES life. To register and/or submit questions:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ny-city-council-district-5-candidates-forum-tickets-152429082489!!

Tuesday, May 25th, 6:30pm: Special Meeting of Community Board 8 on Zoom.  Community comment on New York Blood Center and Longfellow Partners private application to create a “Life Sciences Hub” on the Blood Cener’s existing site in Community District 8.  To join the meeting
   To view the previous April 27th meeting on the subject… Add this week’s May 13th meeting…To let CB8 know how you feel…  And also express your opinion via CM Kallos’s survey

Wednesday, May 26th, 1pm on Webex  Public Meeting on Toxic Chemicals in Children’s Products Law on Webex.  Point of NYS pride that we now have such a law!!  So what products and chemicals is this law designed to ban and how will it be enforced??  To register (required) and find out… 

Wednesday, May 26th, Thursday, May 27th, 2-4pm:  AM Seawright’s Weekly Virtual Knitting Social.  One sure path to UES neighborly acquaintance…   Knit…  Chat…  Share crafty tips…     All you need to do is join in on zoom!!

On the June horizon:

Sunday, June 20th:  92nd Street Greenmarket Reopens!!

First Avenue at 92nd Street , 9am-3pm

Returning for another great market season will be our friends at American Pride Seafood, Ole Mother Hubbert, Kimchee Harvest, Grandpa’s Farm, Halal Pastures, Meredith’s Bakery, Norwich Meadows, Phillips Farm and Sikking Flowers!!   (WOW!!  And maybe more!!)

Plus… The Jazz Foundation will be with us making Opening Day 2021 music that much better!!

Just remember to mask up!!

 
And on that very same June 20th day::

Sunday, June 20th, 10am-2pm:  Shred-A-Thon – So Glad You’re Back Edition
Opposite the 92nd Street Greenmarket, West Side of First Avenue between 92nd & 93rd, 10am-2pm

Bring that paper on, UESiders!!  

And bring it on wearing that mask and socially distancing!!

And, as always, keep in mind:

NO cardboard or plastic-handled shopping bags.

REMOVE paper clips and spiral bindings.

NO HARDCOVER BOOKS.   (But paperbacks are fine.)

May be an image of big cat and outdoors
                                    Lounging (Attentively) in the Central Park Zoo by Jack Donaghy                       

As for the week’s diverting diversions:

Easy ways  to show our love for NYS/NYC parks…  Treehugger’s Best of 2021 Green Tech…  Sew pouches for orphaned baby wildlife (scroll down)…  What’s now in bloom in Carl Schurz…  What to know now  the 2021 camping season’s begun…  NYTimes on “National Parks in a Hotter World”…  That endless excavation at 63rd and York…  How to begin birding…   What our NYS DEC Forest Rangers have been up to…  Conservation Officers have been busy, too…  vaunted UES deli  Sheep working on Governors Island…  Gilded Age mansions once along Fifth Ave

Off the beaten path but great: 

Architecture of Greek Synagogues:  Near & Far, Then & Now

On to the Hudson River Almanac:

5/4 – Albany: On April 14, and again today, the DEC Region 3 Fisheries Unit used gill nets to capture shortnose sturgeon in the Hudson River near Albany in order to surgically implant an acoustic tag. Cumulatively we netted 150 shortnose, a federally Endangered Species, with equal numbers of males and females. The tags are used to track their movements helping us to understand the areas of the estuary that are important to shortnose sturgeon.

The tagged fish are just one phase of a larger project to develop a population estimate for Hudson River shortnose sturgeon. The number of shortnose in the area we sampled on those two days was amazing; many of the sturgeon we found were in spawning condition. Among other species caught and released were American Shad and a huge walleye.

As the year progresses, the fish will move throughout the estuary and will be detected as they move past a river-wide array that will store date and time (like E-Z Pass for sturgeon). In the winter, we will use side-scan sonar to count and another array of receivers to monitor the movement of fish in and out of wintering areas. Funding for this project comes from the Hudson River Foundation and the Hudson River Estuary Program. – Amanda Higgs, Rich Pendleton, Dewayne Fox, Zoraida Maloney, Maija Niemisto

[The shortnose sturgeon were collected and tagged under a National Marine Fisheries Service Endangered Species Act Research permit # 20340. Amanda Higgs]

5/3 – Manhattan: The Inwood Hill Park crabapples near the Isham-Street entrance still had a few blossoms and, farther on, a flowering dogwood was in full blown. Along the path, foliage was lusher than in recent years, and there were now patches of common blue violets. Trees were fully leaved around the Gaelic Field, except for a few eastern redbuds; their leaves unfold later, and their branches were presently outlined in bright red blossoms.

That Black Squirrel

On the path up through The Clove, I was greeted by a very bold melanistic [black] gray squirrel. The foliage was luxuriant though dominated by invasive garlic mustard that has overrun much of the park. But wildflowers had spread as well, and there were scattered patches of violets, wild geranium, Spanish bluebells, as well as abundant lesser celandine and Virginia knotweed.

English and Spanish Bluebells: Features, Facts, and Problems - Owlcation
Spanish Bluebells

In the lower, wetter, part of The Clove, jewelweed was nearly a foot-high promising a prettier display than in recent years. Farther up, Dutchman’s breeches had finished their flowering. At the top of The Clove, a little patch of common hickweed had tiny flowers. Cleavers (bedstraw), with even smaller flowers, was greatly abundant, and the invasive Asian honeysuckle was budding everywhere.

small east-facing alcove on the ridge that is sheltered and backed by a sun-warmed retaining wall, had a potpourri of wildflowers including a carpet of periwinkle, herb-Robert, celandine, cleavers, wild geranium, garlic mustard, Kenilworth ivy, and dandelion. Hanging above the retaining wall were big bunches of wisteria blossoms. At the west-facing Overlook, next to budding honeysuckle, lilacs were blooming.-  Thomas Shoesmith

5/3 – Manhattan: The Randall’s Island Park Alliance Staff began the week with the end of the City Nature Challenge. We were out in the Little Hell Gate Salt Marsh in midday and caught a glimpse of a green heron flying past. We also saw a Baltimore oriole and a cardinal around the salt marsh where pickerelweed was popping up. The new growth was about an inch-high, still very tiny. There were brant hanging out about the Island, and a common yellowthroat was in our freshwater wetland. – Jackie Wu

5/6 – Manhattan: The Randall’s Island Park Alliance Staff began our season of water bird monitoring today. Highlights included a snowy egret at the Bronx Kill Salt Marsh, a great egret along the Bronx Kill Kayak launch, and another one that flew overhead while we were at the Little Hell Gate Salt Marsh. It was a great start to our heron monitoring for the year. – Jackie Wu

Great Egret - Snowy Egret Size and Appearance Comparison - On The Wing  Photography

                                                                        Great Egrets

5/7 – Manhattan: Twice this week, our Hudson River Park’s River Project staff checked the sampling and collection gear that we deploy off Pier 40 in Hudson River Park. The combined catches were impressive, including two more lined sea horses (55, 80 mm). Normally they would have been the highlight, but a hefty adult blackfish (370 mm, 14.6-inch-long) was most memorable. They were joined by an immature blue crab (20 mm-carapace-width) and an adult white perch (210 mm). – Siddhartha Hayes, Toland Kister, Anna Koskol, Olivia Radick

[Blackfish is a colloquial name for tautog (Tautoga onitis) a rather common, bottom-dwelling fish of New York Harbor. Their common name, blackfish, refers to the adults as they attain a deep, coal black color. Among their favorite foods are shellfish that they find in abundance in near-shore rocky areas. In the spirit of “you are what you eat,” blackfish, perhaps owing to their shellfish diet, are one of the most sought-after food fishes. Tom Lake]

And our Fish of the Week:

5/5 – Hudson River Watershed: Fishes-of-the-Week for Week 119 is the silver lamprey (Ichthyomyzon unicuspis), fish number 1 (of 234), on our Hudson River Watershed List of Fishes. 

Silver lamprey
 A Silver Lamprey

The silver lamprey is a freshwater, parasitic, non-native, cartilaginous fish (no bones) that can trace their ancestry back hundreds of millions of years. With a suction-disk mouth (no jaws) filled with small, sharp teeth and a file-like tongue, they use their raspy teeth to cut into a fish’s body and feed on their body fluids. They migrate into tributaries from the river to spawn over sand and gravelly bottoms where they spawn once and then die.

Silver lamprey are not native to the watershed and are believed to have found their way into the upper Hudson through canals from the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. They are nowhere common in the watershed and are seen only when they attach to a larger fish. Silver lamprey adults can generally grow to a length of 12 inches

The most recent appearance by this ethereal species in the watershed occurred in May 2020. Mike Papero caught a 33-inch northern pike in the Hudson River near Schuylerville (river mile 186) that carried a six-inch silver lamprey. – Tom Lake

One interesting Bird of the Week:

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The Bee Basher – AKA Summer Tanager:

North America’s only 100% red bird!!

But we can be 100% green,

UGS

Eco Fact of the Week:   In 2021, there’re 443 functioning nuclear reactors worldwide.   

2021 Compost collected at 96th & Lex (from 4/2/2021):  4/2 – 2 bins, 55 Drop-Offs; 615 lbs.;   326 lbs.;  4/9 – 2 bins, 93 Drop-Offs, 480 lbs. (+47.4%);  4/16 – 3 bins, 136 drop-offs,  621 lbs. (+29.4%) ;  4/23 – 3 bins, 100 Drop-Offs (-1%); 615 lbs.;  4/30 – 135 Drop-Offs, 4 bins, 908 lbs. (+47.6%)
2020 TOTALS (from 1/9/20-3/25/20):    294 bags;  12,522 lbs
2019 TOTALS:    43,417 POUNDS   (21.7 TONS)
2018 TOTALS:    23,231 POUNDS  (11.65 TONS)

Eco Tip of the Week:  Black plastic items can’t be recycled.  Why?  Because recycling facilities sort plastics by bouncing a beam of light off them. Since black plastic absorbs light, it can’t be sorted and goes straight through the system and off to landfill or incineration.  (In our/UESide case, to waste-to-energy in far away PA.)  So, bottom line, toss!!
 

 

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